OVER­COME FLASH CHAL­LENGES

Use of stu­dio flashes can cre­ate prob­lems when ex­per­i­ment­ing with wide apertures for shal­low DOF

Digital Photograper - - Techniques -

DSLRs have a max­i­mum shut­ter speed at which they can ef­fec­tively syn­chro­nise with flash lights. if a shut­ter speed above ap­prox­i­mately 1/200sec is se­lected, de­pend­ing on the cam­era model, the set­ting will ei­ther re­set to that max­i­mum speed or the im­age will be ren­dered with un­even bright­ness, due to the shut­ter cur­tain ap­pear­ing in the frame. if a wide aper­ture is used this cre­ates a prob­lem, since ex­po­sure du­ra­tion can­not be used to re­li­ably con­trol im­age bright­ness – if the flash light is al­ready at the low­est out­put, over­ex­po­sure may oc­cur with the lens wide open. a so­lu­tion is to use a cir­cu­lar nd fil­ter on your lens to cut light in­ten­sity, be­fore it en­ters the cam­era. screw-in fil­ters are prefer­able to square sys­tems in this case, for more con­ve­nient hand­held shoot­ing.

LeftLIM­ITED CON­TROL AT THE LENS’ WIDEST APER­TURE IN THE OUT­DOOR EN­VI­RON­MENT, THE RE­QUIRED SHUT­TER SPEED EX­CEEDS THE MAX­I­MUM FLASH SYNC SPEED, RE­SULT­ING IN FRAMEWIDE OVER­EX­PO­SURE

LeftFIL­TERED IM­AGE WITH THE AID OF A VARI­ABLE ND FIL­TER, SET TO AROUND ONE STOP OF LIGHT RE­DUC­TION, THE LOCKED MAX­I­MUM SHUT­TER SPEED IS NOW SUF­FI­CIENT TO CRE­ATE A BAL­ANCED EX­PO­SURE

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