EDIT SKILLS: WATERMARKING

THAT IM­AGE HAS YOUR NAME ALL OVER IT – LIT­ER­ALLY! JOR­DAN BUT­TERS SHOWS YOU HOW TO QUICKLY AND EAS­ILY PRO­TECT YOUR IM­AGES AGAINST ON­LINE THEFT

Digital SLR Photography - - Contents -

How to pro­tect your work out there on the world wide web. Cre­at­ing a wa­ter­mark brush in Pho­to­shop is easy!

THE WORLD­WIDE WEB is a large and ruth­less place for any pho­tog­ra­pher wish­ing to get their work no­ticed. You might want max­i­mum cov­er­age for your cre­ations to be dis­cov­ered, yet you don’t want peo­ple to start us­ing your im­ages willy- nilly with­out proper re­mu­ner­a­tion or recog­ni­tion. Watermarking is a rel­a­tively sim­ple and straight­for­ward way to go about pro­tect­ing your im­ages, how­ever a bad wa­ter­mark can ruin a good im­age, so you have to strike the bal­ance be­tween pro­tect­ing your prop­erty and al­low­ing your im­ages to be en­joyed. The quick­est and most ef­fec­tive way to wa­ter­mark im­ages in Pho­to­shop is by cre­at­ing a cus­tom brush. Here’s how you go about do­ing it…

1 A

BLANK CAN­VAS We need to cre­ate our wa­ter­mark first. In Pho­to­shop, go to File> New to cre­ate a new doc­u­ment – this will be the can­vas for our logo or text. Set the im­age size to 1000x1000 pix­els. Sin­gle colour water­marks al­ways work best with any im­age, whether colour or black & white, so set the Background Con­tents to White and then click Cre­ate. Your can­vas will load.

2 CRE­ATE

YOUR WA­TER­MARK Go ahead and cre­ate your wa­ter­mark on your blank can­vas, us­ing black as your main colour. This can be text, or a logo, or both if you wish. I’ve used a sim­ple aper­ture shape clip- art that I found for free on­line, and then added the word­ing along­side it. It won’t win any de­sign awards, but it’ll work for this tu­to­rial! Once you’re done, go to Layer> Flat­ten Im­age.

3 SAVE

THE PRE­SET Next, go to Edit> De­fine Brush Pre­set and, in the box that ap­pears, give your logo a name and click OK. Once done, press the B key, or se­lect the Brush Tool, and you’ll see that your wa­ter­mark is now out­lined and ready to use as a brush – just click once to ap­ply it any­where on your im­age. Treat it like any brush shape – you can change its size, colour or opac­ity as nor­mal.

4 MAKE

IT EAS­IER TO FIND By de­fault your wa­ter­mark brush will be placed at the end of your brush col­lec­tion. To make it eas­ier to find, se­lect the Brush Tool and right- click on your im­age. Then click on the cog in the top right and choose Pre­set Man­ager…. Find your logo and drag it to the front of your brushes be­fore click­ing on Done. It’ll al­ways be the first brush in the col­lec­tion from then on.

5 PUT

IT INTO PRAC­TICE It’s time to give your new wa­ter­mark a test run. Open up one of your pho­to­graphs and then go to Layer> New> Layer. Se­lect the Brush Tool and right- click on your im­age to choose your logo brush, if it’s not loaded al­ready. Set the size of your logo us­ing the [ and ] keys, choose the colour that you want and sim­ply click once on your im­age to place your wa­ter­mark.

6 AD­JUST

AS NEEDED Be­cause we placed your wa­ter­mark on a new layer, you can then re­po­si­tion the wa­ter­mark by press­ing the V key ( Move tool), change its opac­ity by chang­ing the Opac­ity in the Lay­ers pal­ette, or use the Trans­form tool ( cmd + T on Mac, ctrl + T on Win­dows) to re­size or ro­tate it. That’s all there is to it – your logo is saved as a brush ready to re­use over and over again.

ORIG­I­NAL IM­AGE

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