PHOTO SKILLS: FRIGHT­FUL FRAMES

THE UN­USUAL EF­FECTS OF MUL­TI­PLE EX­PO­SURES ARE INDIS­PUTABLY EERIE. CARO­LINE SCH­MIDT EX­PLAINS HOW YOU CAN CAP­TURE YOUR OWN HAUNT­ING POR­TRAIT US­ING THIS IN- CAM­ERA TECH­NIQUE

Digital SLR Photography - - Contents -

We have a spooky in- cam­era mul­ti­ple- ex­po­sure tech­nique for you to try out this Hal­loween

Cam­era: NIKON d800 / Lens: NIKON AF- S 50MM F/ 1.4G / ac­ces­sories: TRI­POD

Cel­e­brat­ing all Hal­lows’ eve is a li­cence for trick- or- treat­ing, fright­ful cos­tumes and – best of all – creative pho­tog­ra­phy. eerie long ex­po­sures, low- key por­traits and can­dle- lit still- lifes are some tech­niques worth ex­plor­ing but, out of them all, mul­ti­ple ex­po­sures suit the spooky spir­i­tual essence of Hal­loween the most. and, did i men­tion – there’s no need for any Pho­to­shop trick­ery.

a cam­era’s mul­ti­ple- ex­po­sure fa­cil­ity works by blend­ing the bright­est parts of each im­age, ren­der­ing each shot as a low- opac­ity frame lay­ered on top of the other. Most cam­eras let you merge up to ten im­ages, but you’ll likely get the best ef­fects by shoot­ing and merg­ing two or three frames.

a pop­u­lar tech­nique that’s most com­monly as­so­ci­ated with a dou­ble ex­po­sure is when you shoot a sil­hou­ette against a bright back­ground and then a sec­ond frame that fills the sil­hou­ette with tex­ture. For this tu­to­rial, how­ever, we’ll be fo­cus­ing on a dou­ble ex­po­sure of a sin­gle sub­ject to cre­ate a darker, su­per­nat­u­ral por­trait. whilst the tech­nique orig­i­nates from com­plex film pho­tog­ra­phy, the mul­ti­ple- ex­po­sure fa­cil­ity in many cur­rent dig­i­tal slrs make this as sim­ple as us­ing a tri­pod, di­alling in a few set­tings and imag­i­na­tion. give it a try!

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