Them's Fight­ing Words

DAHL WAS HARDLY THE ONLY AU­THOR PRE­PARED TO SPEAK OUT AGAINST THE FILM ADAP­TA­TIONS OF THEIR WORK

Empire (UK) - - FRONT PAGE -

RAY­MOND CHAN­DLER

Dur­ing his time as a screen­writer, the creator of de­tec­tive Philip Mar­lowe of­ten fell out with his col­lab­o­ra­tors, call­ing Al­fred Hitch­cock a “fat bas­tard” and Billy Wilder a “Nazi”. In a piece for The At­lantic, Chan­dler wrote that Hol­ly­wood was “an end­less con­tention of tawdry egos.”

F. SCOTT FITZGER­ALD

In 1937, the broke Great Gatsby au­thor moved into screen­writ­ing but strug­gled, work­ing on nu­mer­ous films that went nowhere. “Isn’t Hol­ly­wood a dump — in the hu­man sense of the word,” he said in 1940. “A hideous town... full of the hu­man spirit at a new low of de­base­ment.”

TRU­MAN CAPOTE

For the adap­ta­tion of his 1958 novella Break­fast At Tiffany’s, Capote wanted Mar­i­lyn Mon­roe for so­ci­ety girl Holly Go­lightly. When Au­drey Hep­burn was cast, he said, “Para­mount dou­ble-crossed me in ev­ery con­ceiv­able way.” Of the film he said, “It made me want to throw up.”

P. L. TRAVERS

As you’ll know if you’ve seen Sav­ing Mr. Banks, the Mary Pop­pins au­thor bat­tled Dis­ney through­out its production. As you won’t know if you’ve seen Sav­ing Mr. Banks, she de­tested the re­sult. “I was so shocked I felt that I would never write — let alone smile — again!” she wrote to her lawyer.

ALAN MOORE

The au­thor of Watch­men, From Hell and V For Vendetta re­fuses cash or credit for any of the adap­ta­tions he so loathes, and has lit­tle time for the in­dus­try. Ex­am­ple: “It is as if we are freshly hatched birds look­ing up with our mouths open wait­ing for Hol­ly­wood to feed us more re­gur­gi­tated worms.”

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