LIFE AF­TER THE STORM

WHAT ARE THEY?

First News - - Front Page -

HUR­RI­CANE Irma has caused bil­lions of pounds’ worth of dam­age and nearly de­stroyed some is­lands in the Caribbean, so the cleanup is go­ing to be a huge task.

A lot of me­dia at­ten­tion fo­cused on Irma’s path across Florida, but the tiny Caribbean is­land of Bar­buda was hit so hard that Gas­ton Browne, the prime min­is­ter, said that 90% of the is­land’s build­ings are de­stroyed and 60% of the pop­u­la­tion of 1,600 is now home­less.

The Red Cross has launched an ap­peal to raise money for those in the Caribbean af­fected by Hur­ri­cane Irma, and the UK Govern­ment has promised to match every pound do­nated.

IN re­cent weeks, hur­ri­canes have dev­as­tated the Caribbean and Florida, caus­ing bil­lions of pounds’ worth of dam­age, killing dozens of peo­ple and mak­ing thou­sands home­less. But what are hur­ri­canes and how do they form?

The cleanup has also be­gun in south­east Asia, where record mon­soon rains killed more than 1,200 peo­ple. More than 41 mil­lion peo­ple in Nepal, In­dia and Bangladesh have been af­fected, with hun­dreds of thou­sands of peo­ple los­ing their homes, crops and an­i­mals. Mon­soon rains aren’t caused by hur­ri­canes, but a sea­sonal shift in wind di­rec­tion.

Al­though Hur­ri­cane Irma weak­ened as it ap­proached Florida, it was still strong enough to tip over trucks

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