In­no­va­tions

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In 2004, An­dre Geim and Kon­stantin Novoselov used sticky tape to shave graphite down to a one-atom-thick sam­ple, called graphene. It’s the light­est, strong­est and most con­duc­tive ma­te­rial ever dis­cov­ered. It’s dif­fi­cult to work with and ex­pen­sive to pro­duce, but that hasn’t stopped high-tech sportswear com­pany Volle­bak from turn­ing it into a jacket. One side of this re­versible jacket is coated with gun­metal grey graphene, and the other is matt black ny­lon. It’s a wear­able sci­ence ex­per­i­ment: de­pend­ing on how you wear it, the jacket will in­ter­act with your body and the en­vi­ron­ment in dif­fer­ent ways – test on one side, con­trol on the other. And the de­sign­ers want to know what you find out. Volle­bak says that if you wear the jacket in the sun­shine with the graphene side fac­ing out, it’ll ab­sorb huge amounts of heat, which you can then wear against your body to keep you warm. The jacket will set you back £525 and is only avail­able in men’s sizes, but if you’re in­ter­ested in turn­ing your wardrobe into one big sci­ence ex­per­i­ment, then wear­able graphene is a great place to start.

Volle­bak Graphene Jacket

£525, volle­bak.com

Who’d have thought the ‘mir­a­cle ma­te­rial’ graphene would end up in an anorak?

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