Re­ports re­ferred to Her­bert as “the brother of Harry Chapman”

FourFourTwo - - MANAGERS’ BROTHERS -

Ac­cord­ing to the York­shire Post: “The old foot­baller re­vealed con­sid­er­able ap­ti­tude for his new du­ties” as he steered the Tigers to a mid-ta­ble fin­ish.

Ahead of the 1913-14 cam­paign, Harry spoke of lead­ing Hull to pro­mo­tion. Also think­ing of step­ping up was Her­bert, now man­ager at Leeds City. The brothers’ teams met three times dur­ing the sea­son: Harry’s Hull won both league games and knocked Her­bert’s Leeds out of the West Rid­ing Cup. “[Hull’s] tac­tics were ei­ther putting the Leeds men off their game, or ex­pos­ing inherent weak­nesses in their play,” noted the Post. Hull’s style of play was con­sid­ered much more ef­fec­tive than the “slow and closer pass­ing game” be­ing at­tempted by Her­bert’s Leeds. Could Harry have been as tac­ti­cally as­tute as his more fa­mous brother, or per­haps even more so? Foot­ball never got the chance to find out.

In July 1914, Harry be­came se­ri­ously ill and af­ter a sin­gle full sea­son as a man­ager, he was forced to re­sign and con­fined to a sana­to­rium, suf­fer­ing from then-in­cur­able tu­ber­cu­lo­sis.

Af­ter two years, dur­ing which his wife Mi­randa passed away, the ail­ing Harry went to stay with Her­bert in Leeds. He died at Her­bert’s home in April 1916, aged36. He left three sons, the old­est of whom, Harry Jr, would later fol­low his father and un­cle into foot­ball man­age­ment, with a spell at the helm of Shrews­bury Town. While Harry is largely for­got­ten, Her­bert is re­mem­bered as a great mod­erniser. He rev­o­lu­tionised foot­ball tac­tics and train­ing, and cham­pi­oned in­no­va­tions such as flood­lights and shirt num­bers. He won two league ti­tles and the FA Cup with Hud­der­s­field, and re­peated the feat with Arse­nal. But, af­ter nine years at High­bury, Her­bert would also suc­cumb to ill­ness. “The brother of Harry Chapman” died from pneu­mo­nia in Jan­uary 1934,

aged 55.

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