How to… Look good for au­tumn

Gay Times Magazine - - Style -

With au­tumn fi­nally upon us, now’s the time to ad­just your groom­ing rou­tine to suit the sea­son. Here are Groom­ing Guru Lee Ky­nas­ton’s tips for look­ing

fab­u­lous this fall. 01. Fac­tor in some sun pro­tec­tion. It’s easy to think that once the sum­mer’s over there’s no need for sun pro­tec­tion, but while there’s lit­tle risk of be­ing burnt by the sun’s UVB rays, the in­ten­sity of its age­ing UVA ones doesn’t di­min­ish – even when it’s cloudy. So if you’re keen on pro­tect­ing skin from sunin­duced fine lines, wrin­kles and age spots, con­tinue us­ing a mois­turiser with a built-in sun­screen like No7 Men Pro­tect & Per­fect In­tense SPF15 Day Mois­turiser (£25 from boots.com) in the morn­ings. And since cold air con­tains 30% less mois­ture than the warm stuff, it’s worth com­bat­ting its dry­ing ef­fects by ap­ply­ing a mois­turiser spe­cially designed for dry skin, like Kiehl’s Ul­tra Fa­cial Deep Mois­ture Balm (£24 from feelu­nique.com) just be­fore bed. More en­ter­tain­ing bed­time ac­tiv­i­ties there may be, but few that will im­prove your looks in quite the same way.

02.

Be a bronze age man. Tan fad­ing faster than Union J’s hopes of scoring a mon­ster hit? No wor­ries, put some colour back into your cheeks – and fore­head and neck – with the help of a bronzer like Clin­ique For Men’s Face Bronzer (£22 from clin­ique.co.uk) – a tinted mois­turiser that gives skin some much needed colour but washes off, so there’s no risk of tan­ning ac­ci­dents. Al­ter­na­tively, pimp up your reg­u­lar mois­turiser by adding a few drops of Clar­in­sMen’s new Tan­ning Booster (£20 from clar­ins.co.uk).

The re­sults are longer last­ing, but be­cause you con­trol how much you use you can build up the colour over time so there’s no chance of look­ing like Björk one day and Bey­oncé the next.

03.

Put some honey on your hair. Your bar­net gets a right bat­ter­ing at this time of year – wind and cold, dry air cause its outer cuticles to lift mak­ing it look straw-like while warm, dry air in­doors sucks mois­ture, leav­ing it dry, frizzy and prone to static. Us­ing a con­di­tioner can help close the cuticles and add shine, but many make hair limp – not great if you’re rock­ing a pom­padour – so make your own au­tum­nal hair con­di­tioner by mix­ing a ta­ble­spoon of honey with a ta­ble­spoon of ap­ple cider vine­gar and mas­sage into your hair.

Honey is a nat­u­ral humec­tant, which means it at­tracts wa­ter and helps bind it to the hair, while the vine­gar will help smooth cuticles. Leave in for 15 min­utes then rinse off with plenty of cool wa­ter.

04.

Avoid ir­ri­ta­tion. Ac­cord­ing to one sur­vey, more than 60% of peo­ple who suf­fer from eczema – a skin con­di­tion that causes the skin to be­come itchy, dry and cracked – ex­pe­ri­ence a wors­en­ing of symp­toms in the Au­tumn, partly due to cold, dry winds and cen­tral heat­ing. If you’re one of them, swap skin ir­ri­tat­ing woolies for cot­ton or syn­thetic fi­bres, avoid harsh detergents (a good ex­cuse for not wash­ing up) and keep skin hy­drated with a fra­grance-free, oil-based mois­turiser like Sk­in­fix’s Eczema Balm (£11.24 from boots.com) ap­ply­ing im­me­di­ately af­ter show­er­ing to lock in the mois­ture.

05.

Get au­tum­nal with your eau. In the same way that lighter, fresher, cit­rus-based fra­grances tend to work bet­ter in the sum­mer, heav­ier, richer, more po­tent fra­grances come into their own when the weather cools, the nights draw in and we crave things that com­fort.

Espe­cially good for this time of year are woody, spicy and leath­ery fra­grances, so check out new of­fer­ings like Aramis’ Mod­ern Leather (£55 for 60ml from johnlewis. com); Tom Ford’s spicy

Noir An­thracite (£81.50 from the­fra­granceshop. co.uk) and Givenchy’s woody, patchoulitinged Gen­tle­man Givenchy (£48 from thep­er­fumeshop. com). Also per­fect for au­tumn is Con­crete, the latest of­fer­ing from al­t­fra­grance spe­cial­ists Comme des Garçons

(£115 from Sel­fridges. com). Don’t worry, it smells of san­dal­wood and spices not side

walks.

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