KNOW THE RULES

Get it right on the course more of­ten with our monthly R&A mas­ter­class

Golf Monthly - - Rory Mcilroy -

hona McRae, R&A as­sis­tant di­rec­tor – Rules, ex­plains that four­ball matches can pro­ceed even if a side is un­able to field two play­ers, as was the case in the LPGA Tour’s re­cent UL In­ter­na­tional Crown event…

Melissa Reid and Charley Hull of Eng­land were due to play a four­ball match against Ja­pan’s Haru No­mura and Mika Miyazato in the UL In­ter­na­tional Crown in July this year, when news came through that Hull was un­well and would no longer be able to tee it up.

This left Reid to play the match against the Ja­panese side on her own. She de­cided to take on the pair­ing and bat­tled to a re­mark­able 1dn loss, much to the sur­prise and de­light of the spec­ta­tors who were will­ing her on as the un­der­dog.

S“Walk­ing up a few holes, the crowd were just amaz­ing, ev­ery­one cheer­ing me on. I needed that. I felt kind of on my own out there and they re­ally kept my spir­its up,” Reid said af­ter­wards.

Play­ing a four­ball match and rep­re­sent­ing the side on your own will hope­fully only ever be a rare oc­cur­rence, but is cer­tainly per­mis­si­ble un­der the Rules. Rule 30-3a states that a side in four­ball match play may be rep­re­sented by one part­ner for all or some of the match. Both part­ners do not need to be present.

How­ever, should your part­ner turn up late or re­cover suf­fi­ciently in time to still par­tic­i­pate in the match, the ab­sent part­ner can join in, but must wait un­til the hole cur­rently be­ing played has been com­pleted. The part­ner can join the match be­tween the play of holes, but not dur­ing the play of a hole. There is no penalty to the part­ner for be­ing late or join­ing in the match at a later time.

Although the ab­sent part­ner can only join the match be­tween the play of holes once the hole cur­rently be­ing played has been com­pleted, he or she can of­fer their part­ner ad­vice dur­ing the play­ing of that hole.

As the UL In­ter­na­tional Crown event was a pro­fes­sional com­pe­ti­tion, hand­i­caps were not rel­e­vant. How­ever, what do you do in a hand­i­cap match if the player with the low­est hand­i­cap is un­able to play for the side?

In de­ter­min­ing hand­i­cap al­lowances, the hand­i­caps of the three play­ers should be re­duced by the hand­i­cap of the ab­sent player. Although not present, they are still con­sid­ered part of the side, and this should be taken into ac­count when de­ter­min­ing the strokes to be given and re­ceived.

Mel Reid was forced to go it alone at the UL In­ter­na­tional Crown

Both part­ners do not need to be present

Ab­sent part­ners can join the match be­tween the play of holes, but not dur­ing the play of a hole

In a hand­i­cap match, the ab­sent player’s hand­i­cap should be taken into ac­count when de­ter­min­ing strokes to be given/re­ceived

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.