THE NHS IS BORN

One of Bri­tain’s defin­ing in­sti­tu­tions was born out of high pub­lic de­mand

History Revealed - - IN PICTURES POST-WAR BRITAIN -

CHANGE IS NYE

Aneurin ‘Nye’ Be­van, the Min­is­ter of Health, was one of the NHS’s pi­o­neers. When the con­tro­ver­sial Bev­eridge Re­port of 1942 was pub­lished, it rec­om­mended the cre­ation of a wel­fare state with a health ser­vice to care for Bri­tain’s sick and in­jured. Be­van’s guid­ing prin­ci­ples were that health­care should meet the needs of ev­ery­one, be free at the point of de­liv­ery, and not be based on the pa­tient’s abil­ity to pay.

VI­SION OF THE FU­TURE

As well as stan­dard hos­pi­tal and GP ser­vices, the new NHS in­cluded den­tal work and op­ti­cianry. In this image, a young woman from Bris­tol is be­ing tested for a new pair of ba­sic spec­ta­cles, which for the firsttime would be 100 per cent free. So-called ‘fancy frames’ cost ex­tra.

CRA­DLE TO GRAVE

A new­born baby is placed on chilly iron scales to be weighed, while its mother watches at­ten­tively. Be­van’s idea was that health­care would cover peo­ple right from their mother’s preg­nancy to the very end of their nat­u­ral lives.

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