KITCHEN

Tak­ing its style cues from the orig­i­nal 19th-cen­tury farm­house, this fam­ily kitchen in a new ex­ten­sion is a les­son in wel­com­ing coun­try chic

Homes & Gardens - - CONTENTS -

Set in a new ex­ten­sion, this scheme takes its cues from the orig­i­nal 19th-cen­tury farm­house.

CAN YOU DE­SCRIBE THE PROP­ERTY?

It is a beau­ti­ful five-bed­room 19th-cen­tury farm­house in Hamp­shire. This kitchen is ac­tu­ally in a new ex­ten­sion; the orig­i­nal kitchen was in a small, dark room with oak cab­i­nets at the back of the prop­erty. By ex­tend­ing, the own­ers not only gained a big­ger, more so­cia­ble space, but the light lev­els and views were vastly im­proved.

HOW DID YOU PLAN THE LAY­OUT?

We fo­cused on cook­ing, eat­ing and en­ter­tain­ing with a sim­ple L-shape run of units, an is­land and a din­ing table. We used the ever-faith­ful work­ing tri­an­gle for­ma­tion for the sink, oven and fridge to max­imise ef­fi­ciency while prep­ping, cook­ing and clean­ing.

WHAT IN­SPIRED THE OVER­ALL LOOK?

We had a good un­der­stand­ing of the own­ers’ life­style and tastes, but the build­ing’s ar­chi­tec­ture, with its tra­di­tional stonework and sash win­dows, also strongly in­flu­enced the dé­cor. As this kitchen is the home’s so­cial hub, we wanted it to be calm, com­fort­able and wel­com­ing. Tak­ing in­spi­ra­tion from the orig­i­nal farm­house’s char­ac­ter, we col­lated a pal­ette of neu­tral, sooth­ing colours and tex­tures to give it a mod­ern lift. The ceil­ing was pan­elled in white-washed tim­ber and we chose crisp paint shades for the cab­i­netry. The units are in an ar­che­typal coun­try style and the dresser in the din­ing area is also im­bued with ru­ral charm.

AND THE OTHER MA­TE­RI­ALS AND FIN­ISHES?

For the work­tops, we chose a blue-grey gran­ite with a honed fin­ish. It has just enough colour to lift the room’s pale pal­ette and is very durable and fam­ily friendly. The walls are painted in a warm neu­tral tone that works well with the pale cab­i­nets and oak sur­faces.

WHY ARE THERE NO WALL CAB­I­NETS?

Tall larders make bet­ter use of the ver­ti­cal stor­age potential, es­pe­cially in a room with a high ceil­ing. It is best to con­tain tall stor­age in one area to pre­vent it over­pow­er­ing the space, so we in­stalled two tall larders side-by-side, one of which houses a fully in­te­grated fridge. We then added a slim-line shelv­ing unit for dec­o­ra­tive de­tail and cook­ery books.

WHAT AP­PLI­ANCES DID YOU CHOOSE?

The only vis­i­ble appliance is the range cooker, which is an elec­tric model that the own­ers chose for its en­ergy ef­fi­ciency and am­bi­ent heat. We had a ro­bust oak-clad man­tel built above it, with plas­tered cor­bels to mimic a hearth. All other ap­pli­ances are fully in­te­grated to main­tain the feel of a tra­di­tional farm­house kitchen.

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THE LIGHT­ING?

Wall and pen­dant lights above the is­land can be used in­de­pen­dently from the down­light­ing, which is im­por­tant in a mul­ti­func­tional room. At the flick of a switch, the kitchen can be trans­formed into a softly lit din­ing room.

ABOVE Pen­dant lights above the is­land have tele­scopic ad­just­ments so that they can be po­si­tioned at dif­fer­ent heights as re­quired. BE­LOW Clas­sic coun­try fea­tures, such as painted fur­ni­ture and a large ce­ramic sink, are in keep­ing with the tra­di­tional farm­house style and make the kitchen feel homely.

DE­SIGNER Garry Meakins, head of de­sign, Sims Hilditch, 01249 783087, simshilditch.com.

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