“BA­NANAS ARE A FRUIT”

How It Works - - ENVIRONMENT MYTHS -

It’s another ‘is a tomato a fruit or a veg­etable?’ de­bate. Botan­i­cally, a fruit is de­fined as a seed-bear­ing struc­ture that de­vel­ops from the flow­er­ing plants of a woody tree or bush. The evo­lu­tion­ary pur­pose for this struc­ture is to en­tice an­i­mals to eat the juicy sweet or sour fruit, help­ing to spread the seeds in their waste, thereby help­ing plants re­pro­duce.

The hum­ble ba­nana, how­ever, does not en­cap­su­late its seeds around a fleshy fruit. In­stead, the small black seeds (the lit­tle dots in the mid­dle) are within the ba­nana’s flesh, mak­ing it more of a berry, which they would be clas­si­fied as if their seeds were fer­tile. Since ba­nanas have been com­mer­cially grown the seeds do not ma­ture, and the ‘tree’ a ba­nana grows on doesn’t con­tain true woody tis­sue, mak­ing them a sim­ple herb.

Ba­nanas grow in what are known as ‘hands’

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