Laugh­ter myths busted!

In the Moment - - Wellbeing -

MYTHS ABOUT LAUGH­ING AREN’T OB­VI­OUS BUT CAN AF­FECT HOW WE THINK, FEEL AND BE­HAVE WHEN IT

COMES TO LET­TING GO...

We must be happy in or­der to laugh

This myth in­hibits many peo­ple from laugh­ing as they feel that it would be in­au­then­tic or ‘false’ to laugh when they didn’t feel like it. If we wait for the per­fect time to laugh, or wait for ev­ery­thing in life to be run­ning smoothly, we may never laugh at all! Laugh­ter can sur­prise us and of­fer re­lief in times of tur­moil, sad­ness or even grief, if we al­low it to.

We need some­thing funny to hap­pen be­fore we can laugh

Com­edy is great and can be the trig­ger for many a hearty chor­tle. Yet ev­i­dence shows that the ma­jor­ity of our laugh­ter doesn’t come from jokes; it comes from day to day con­ver­sa­tions and play­ful­ness. If we wait for some­thing funny to hap­pen we may be wait­ing for a re­ally long time.

Laugh­ter is too good to leave to chance. Laugh­ter is not a pas­sive ac­tiv­ity, it is a

‘to­tal im­mer­sion, com­mit­ment to ev­ery­day happiness’ type of process. If we want to en­joy life to the full, we need to make our own happiness as we travel, rather than wait for the en­ter­tain­ment bus to show up.

We ei­ther have a nat­u­ral propen­sity to laugh or not

It doesn’t mat­ter if you’re a shy or in­tro­verted per­son, or if you haven’t laughed for a re­ally long time – it’s not about who can laugh the longest, loud­est or hearti­est. It doesn’t mat­ter if you feel you’ve lost your abil­ity to laugh or you can’t re­mem­ber the last time you laughed. The good news is, laugh­ter is ac­ces­si­ble to us all. It is a re-learn­able skill that can be re-ac­quired, one chuckle at a time.

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