MISS­ING A LOVED ONE

In the Moment - - Wellbeing -

Bron­agh, 35, Kent

“I al­ways loved Christ­mas. I come from an Ir­ish fam­ily and dad and I were re­ally close. Ev­ery year it was our tra­di­tion to go and buy a Christ­mas tree from the same place. We would go for a fry-up at the same café and come home and put the tree up, al­ways hav­ing the same ar­gu­ment about why he wouldn’t buy a stand for the tree, in­stead of prop­ping it up with two bricks in a bucket, which al­ways made the tree wob­bly!

“When he died from a heart at­tack in 2014

I was dev­as­tated. I re­mem­ber cry­ing and think­ing that life would never be the same, but also that Christ­mas would never be the same. The rst time, in­stead of hav­ing lunch at home and hav­ing to look at dad’s empty chair at the ta­ble, we went out to the pub for lunch, which did help.

“Now I have a lit­tle girl and I want to make Christ­mas special for her, like my mum and dad did for me. My husband says it’s time for us to start mak­ing our own tra­di­tions as a fam­ily and I agree, but it still feels weird be­cause I thought I’d al­ways cel­e­brate it at my par­ents’. When I see all of the Christ­mas ad­verts they make me think about all the peo­ple who have lost some­one they love. Christ­mas is a re­ally bit­ter­sweet time now.”

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