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Learn how sto­icism can build re­silience.

In the Moment - - Contents -

FOUNDED BY THE AN­CIENT GREEKS, STO­ICISM WAS ALSO PRAC­TICED BY RO­MAN PHILOSO­PHER SENECA, AND USED BY RO­MAN EM­PEROR MAR­CUS AURE­LIUS AS A WAY TO OVER­COME STRIFE AND TURN TROU­BLES INTO TRI­UMPH. TAKE JU­LIA WILLS’ QUIZ, THEN TURN THE PAGE FOR PRAC­TI­CAL TIPS ON HOW TO KEEP CALM AND CARRY ON...

YOU’RE IN A RUSH AT THE SU­PER­MAR­KET. UN­FOR­TU­NATELY, THE CUS­TOMER IN FRONT OF YOU HAS A PROB­LEM WITH THEIR CARD PAY­MENT AND NO AS­SIS­TANT AP­PEARS WHEN THE CASHIER RINGS THE BELL. WHAT DO YOU DO?

A Fling your bas­ket down nois­ily and har­rumph out of the store with­out what you came for.

B Com­plain loudly about how an­noy­ing the sit­u­a­tion is to the peo­ple be­hind you in the queue. C Take a deep breath. The shop is busy and some­one will sort it out in a minute.

HOW MUCH DO YOU AGREE WITH THE STATE­MENT: “LIFE IS ALL ABOUT HOW YOU LOOK AT IT”?

A Not at all.

B It de­pends on the sit­u­a­tion. C This is my life mantra.

YOUR FRIEND SAYS THAT A MU­TUAL FRIEND HAS BEEN BAD-MOUTHING YOU.

YOU DE­CIDE TO:

A Im­me­di­ately drop the mu­tual friend, with­out an ex­pla­na­tion. You don’t need that neg­a­tive en­ergy in your life. B Start bad-mouthing your mu­tual friend; you never re­ally liked her any­way and clearly this is the na­ture of the friend­ship now.

C Won­der what the prob­lem might be and, re­mem­ber­ing what a good friend she has been in the past, talk to her about it.

A COL­LEAGUE IS PRO­MOTED OVER YOU WHEN YOU FELT YOU TO­TALLY DE­SERVED

THE JOB. DO YOU:

A Hand in your no­tice the next day. Who wants to work for a com­pany that doesn’t value you?

B Try to un­der­mine your pro­moted col­league when­ever you can, to point out her flaws to man­age­ment.

C Feel dis­ap­pointed but ac­cept the sit­u­a­tion and talk to your man­ager about how you can gain more skills so that next time, it’ll be you.

YOU MISLAY YOUR PHONE AND NEED TO LEAVE FOR AN AP­POINT­MENT. YOUR FIRST THOUGHT IS:

A I’m to­tally use­less. I’m al­ways los­ing things.

B Why has this hap­pened to me now? I so don’t need this!

C When did I have it last?

A Rage at the ticket col­lec­tor – they are a rep­re­sen­ta­tive of the lousy train com­pany, af­ter all.

B Drum your fin­gers, huff and sigh loudly. This al­ways hap­pens to you, and now your evening is ru­ined.

C Carry on read­ing your book. You’d just got to a good bit and it’s nice to have some ex­tra time to en­joy it.

“We can­not choose our ex­ter­nal cir­cum­stances, but we can al­ways choose how we re­spond to them.”

Epicte­tus, Greek Stoic philoso­pher

YOU ARE STUCK ON A LATE-RUN­NING TRAIN ON YOUR WAY HOME. IT’S THE THIRD TIME THIS WEEK. ALL AROUND YOU PEO­PLE ARE COM­PLAIN­ING. DO YOU:

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