In­gre­di­ents that can ir­ri­tate

WHAT NOT TO PUT ON YOUR SKIN

In the Moment - - Wellbeing -

* SYN­THETIC SKIN­CARE

It can be dif cult to know the ori­gins of the prod­ucts used in our skin­care rou­tine. “There’s no need to use syn­thetic in­gre­di­ents on our skin,” says Rebecca Martin, cre­ator of Con­scious Skin­care hand­made prod­ucts (www.con­scious-skin­care.com). “There are al­ways al­ter­na­tives. Na­ture, as usual, can of­fer some­thing just as good – I use a ve­gan-friendly ver­sion of hyaluronic acid made from recog­nis­able nat­u­ral in­gre­di­ents, such as brewer’s yeast.”

* CHEM­I­CAL IR­RI­TANTS

Many chem­i­cal skin­care in­gre­di­ents are ac­tu­ally known ir­ri­tants; these in­clude sodium lau­rel sul­phates, arti cial fra­grances, parabens, preser­va­tives and ph­tha­lates. It’s easy to iden­tify them on la­bels – look for prod­ucts that don’t con­tain them.

* WA­TER WOES

In the quest for calm­ing our ir­ri­tated skin, even for ba­bies and chil­dren, one fac­tor that’s of­ten for­got­ten is the wa­ter we use to bathe in. It’s full of chlo­rine, which is ex­tremely dry­ing for the skin. An easy x is to use a lter. The Sen­si­tive Skin­care Com­pany (www.sen­si­tive­skin­car­eco.com) make a de-chlo­ri­na­tion lter that ts onto a shower at­tach­ment, or a ball to hang from your bath taps to lter as you go.

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