FAN­TAS­TIC FOUR

Japanese Performance - - FEATURES -

JUST LIKE MORE CYLIN­DERS USU­ALLY EQUATES TO MORE POWER, IN RO­TARY LAND, MORE ROTORS CAN DO THE SAME. MAZDA KNOWS THIS, AND PROVED IT WITH THE R26B – THE FIRM’S MOST IN­FA­MOUS QUADROTOR EN­GINE EVER, WHICH POW­ERED ITS EARLY ’90S LE MANS-WIN­NING 767 AND 787B RACECARS – THE FIRST CAR TO DO SO WITH­OUT PIS­TONS AND RODS. UN­LIKE PIS­TON-BASED EN­GINES, WHERE YOU’RE CON­STRAINED BY HOW­EVER MANY HOLES YOUR BLOCK’S GOT, RO­TARY EN­GINES’ HOUSINGS CAN BE MATED TO­GETHER FORM­ING TRIPLE,

QUAD AND PO­TEN­TIALLY EVEN FIVE OR SIX-RO­TOR MON­STERS. DO IT RIGHT AND YOU’VE JUST IN­CREASED DIS­PLACE­MENT AND THE ABIL­ITY TO MAKE A WHOLE LOT MORE POWER. THE PROCESS IS EV­ERY BIT AS COM­PLI­CATED AS YOU THINK IT’D BE, THOUGH,

AND, WHEN IT COMES TO AS­SEM­BLING A QUAR­TET OR MORE ROTORS TO­GETHER, THE COSTS CAN MOUNT UP FAST. THAT’S BE­CAUSE OF THINGS LIKE THE CUS­TOM EC­CEN­TRIC SHAFT THAT’S GOT TO BE MADE THAT, LIKE A CRANK DOES FOR ITS CYLIN­DERS, PASSES THROUGH EACH RO­TOR HOUS­ING, AL­LOW­ING THEM TO SYNC UP WITH ONE AN­OTHER.

BUT THEN THERE’S THAT UNMISTAKABLE SOUND AND, ALL OF A SUD­DEN, ALL THE MONEY SPENT SEEMS WELL WORTH IT

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.