THE GARAGE

FREE-FLOW­ING EX­HAUSTS AND SOLID ENGINE MOUNTS IM­PROVE PREFORMANCE, BUT CAN CAUSE A LOT OF UN­WANTED NOISE AND VI­BRA­TION. STEP FOR­WARD DY­NA­MAT – THE MOST EF­FI­CIENT NOISE KILLER ON THE MAR­KET

Japanese Performance - - WHAT’S IN -

Project Type R gets a new un­der­coat of Dy­na­mat Xtreme to kill un­wanted noise, Project Z gets some sexy new rolling stock and Project 5 gets its loom on and a spot of flock­ing, but there’s trou­ble brew­ing ahead!

Reg­u­lar read­ers of this mag­a­zine will be well aware of the per­for­mance ben­e­fits of a wide range of tun­ing parts, how­ever, like most things in life, there are al­ways com­pro­mises to be made. What gives with one hand of­ten takes away with the other. We found this out first hand with Project Type R. In our quest for in­creased per­for­mance we have more than dou­bled the stock power out­put of the K20 engine and up­rated the sus­pen­sion with polyurethane bushes and stiffer coilover sus­pen­sion. And while this has made the car much faster and more fun to drive, it has come at a cost: noise.

With 400bhp scream­ing through the ex­haust and the up­rated engine mounts try­ing to con­tain the rag­ing mo­tor un­der the bon­net, it’s no sur­prise that the EP3’S in­nards can be­come bor­der­line deaf­en­ing when the pedal hits the metal. And for some, this is a fair trade-off. For ex­am­ple, any­one build­ing a pure race­car is more than likely to sac­ri­fice pretty much all crea­ture com­forts in the pur­suit of pure speed, even go­ing to the ex­treme of re­mov­ing all ex­tra­ne­ous weight such as car­pets, sound dead­en­ing, dashes and door cards. But then there are the oth­ers who, like us, want it all. They want a stupidly fast car that han­dles like a gokart, yet they also want to be able to lis­ten to their tunes and hold a con­ver­sa­tion with their pas­sen­gers with­out the aid of a Rally-spec in­ter­com.

So what can you do if you’ve in­ad­ver­tantly pumped up the vol­ume on your ride and want to

lower the tone a touch? Well, re­duc­ing per­for­mance is not an op­tion, no mat­ter what the re­sult­ing ear-bash­ing, so there must be an­other way. En­ter Dy­na­mat Xtreme.

Some of you out there may have heard of Dy­na­mat be­fore, as it has been around, mainly in high-end car au­dio cir­cles, for over 20-years. Used most com­monly as a way for au­dio in­stall­ers to stop car pan­els from rat­tling and pro­vid­ing a solid, res­o­nance free sur­face for mount­ing high qual­ity speak­ers and sub­woofers, it is a se­ri­ously ef­fec­tive so­lu­tion. Not only do the treated pan­els lose their tinny, rat­tly qual­ity, but the speak­ers them­selves are free from dis­tor­tion-caus­ing res­o­nances mean­ing more pre­cise and con­trolled out­put and weight­ier bass. But in-car au­dio isn’t the only rea­son you may want to fit the self ad­he­sive alu­minium-backed sheets to your car, as they also do an ex­cel­lent job of re­duc­ing the as­so­ci­ated noise and vi­bra­tions that of­ten ac­com­pany per­for­mance tun­ing.

We got two packs of Dy­na­mat Xtreme, which is the thick­est and most ef­fec­tive op­tion, as we wanted to max­imise the ef­fec­tive­ness and re­duce the ex­haust drone as much as pos­si­ble. A light­weight

op­tion called Dy­na­mat Superlite is also avail­able for those con­scious of adding too much ex­tra weight. Two packs equate to 72sq ft of cov­er­age and was enough to cover the Civic from the front footwells all the way back to the boot, with both in­ner and outer skins of the doors and rear quar­ters cov­ered, too.

To help us gut the Civic and in­stall the Dy­na­mat, we roped in the skills of ex­pe­ri­enced Honda tuner, Phil Craf­ford from Dream Au­to­mo­tive.

The process be­gins af­ter you have stripped the in­te­rior by clean­ing, vac­u­um­ing and degreasing the pan­els where you want to ap­ply the mat­ting. You should also re­move any OEM sound-dead­en­ing first, but luck­ily the EP3 only fea­tures a small square un­der each­front seat, so the reat was plain sail­ing. We used brake cleaner to en­sure the sur­face was clean and would make sure the mat­ting stayed stuck.

We started on the front doors, as they are clos­est to your ears and also ben­e­fit from a more solid sound when open­ing and clos­ing the doors, as well as of­fer­ing the per­fect base for your car’s main au­dio speak­ers. In fact, it was amaz­ing just how much bet­ter the puny OEM speak­ers sounded af­ter in­stal­la­tion, we can’t wait to try some up­graded ones in there in the fu­ture!

Af­ter the doors we moved onto the boot area and worked our way for­wards. The boot and rear wheel arches are par­tic­u­lar ar­eas where sound trans­fers into the cabin so are ar­eas of max­i­mum ben­e­fit to be cov­ered with Dy­na­mat.

We com­pleted the whole process, in­clud­ing re­fit­ting all the in­te­rior, in just one day and the re­sult is def­i­nitely worth the ef­fort. Not only does the Civic sound qui­eter, mak­ing long jour­neys and lis­ten­ing to au­dio more pleas­ant, but it has also re­duced vi­bra­tions from the up­rated mounts and damp­ened the sound of imperfections in the road, mean­ing the car feels more solid all round.

The weird­est thing is, even though we have tech­ni­cally added a few ex­tra ki­los in weight, the fact that the ex­haust and engine now sound qui­eter means the car ac­tu­ally feels faster, as you are go­ing the same speed but with­less noise, so it feels like the car isn’t work­ing as hard to pro­duce the speed. We know that’s sim­ply a placebo ef­fect, but it’s a bonus, none­the­less –

DY­NA­MAT SHEETS CAN BE EAS­ILY CUT TO SHAPE WITH A BLADE OR SCISSORS

AF­TER CLEAN­ING AND DEGREASING THE DOORS IN­SIDE AND OUT THE DY­NA­MAT WAS AP­PLIED WITH A RUB­BER ROLLER EN­SUR­ING MAX­I­MUM ADHESION

THE CIVIC’S BOOT IS A BIG CUL­PRIT FOR TRANS­MIT­TING EX­HAUST DRONE INTO THE CAR. AF­TER PREP­PING THE SUR­FACE WE COVER THE WHOLE AREA IN DY­NA­MAT

WE CAR­RIED THE PROCESS ON TO THE WHEEL ARCHES, QUAR­TER PAN­ELS, SEAT AR­EAS AND FOOTWELLS. THE ONLY OEM DEAD­EN­ING IS UN­DER THE FRONT SEATS

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