RAY TORO

HE FI­NALLY RE­LEASED AN AL­BUM IN 2016 – BUT IT WAS A FOR­MER BAND­MATE THAT BLEW RAY AWAY...

Kerrang! (UK) - - My 2016 -

YOUR 2016: ‘HELL YEAH’ OR ‘FUCK NO’?

“Def­i­nitely more ‘hell yeah’! It’s been super ex­cit­ing get­ting my record [Re­mem­ber The Laugh­ter] out af­ter putting so much work into it. I spent prob­a­bly the first half of the year fo­cus­ing on it, get­ting the fi­nal mix­ing and mas­ter­ing done, and af­ter that there was a lot of work around the set up for the re­lease, so it re­ally has been a huge thing in my life. I’ve ac­tu­ally been quite happy to take a break from writ­ing and think­ing about mak­ing new mu­sic, and it’s been fun get­ting ready to tour the record. I did it all at home by my­self, so re­cently I’ve got­ten to play with other mu­si­cians for the first time in ages, and I’ve been hav­ing such a good time with that!”

HOW DID IT FEEL WHEN RE­MEM­BER THE LAUGH­TER RE­CEIVED A GLOW­ING RE­CEP­TION?

“Oh, just in­cred­i­ble, way bet­ter than I could have ever ex­pected. Be­fore it came out I was kind of wor­ry­ing about how dif­fer­ent it sounds, com­pared to what peo­ple might ex­pect go­ing by my pre­vi­ous work, and the great­est thing for me has been the amount of peo­ple say­ing that yeah, it’s an un­ex­pected sound, but they re­ally love what I’m do­ing.”

WITH IT BE­ING THE 10TH AN­NIVER­SARY OF THE BLACK PA­RADE, WAS IT A NOS­TAL­GIC YEAR?

“It was, yeah.any time an an­niver­sary like that rolls around you start think­ing about where you were when you made it, what else was go­ing on in your life, and cer­tainly the ca­ma­raderie you were feel­ing with these other peo­ple. It also gives you the op­por­tu­nity to take a step back and look at things with a dif­fer­ent per­spec­tive. Ob­vi­ously at the time we were mak­ing it we had no idea what would re­ally hap­pen, but even af­ter the suc­cess it had I don’t think any of us re­ally un­der­stood the im­pact it had on peo­ple un­til now.”

WHAT WAS THE BEST SHOW YOU AT­TENDED?

“I didn’t go to many, but the best was see­ing Frank [Iero] with my fam­ily when he played in LA. Each time I see him live, there’s just so much growth in how he plays and sings, and his song­writ­ing just gets bet­ter and bet­ter. It’s awe­some to watch – he was born to make the mu­sic he makes, and it’s a cool thing to see.”

WHICH CELEBRITY DEATH MOST AF­FECTED YOU?

“It would have to be Gene Wilder.to me, he re­ally rep­re­sented child­hood in­no­cence, as Willy Wonka, cer­tainly, but in other roles, too, such as the movies he made with Mel Brooks. He brought this re­ally hu­man level to his com­edy, and I love how he spent his life want­ing to make peo­ple happy.this year has been full of so much po­lit­i­cal strife and the ‘me ver­sus them’ at­ti­tude, and when I heard that he had died I felt like we had lost a re­ally good hu­man spirit. I think the world could do with a lot more peo­ple like him.”

WHOSE AL­BUM BLEW YOUR MIND?

“Hon­estly, I gotta go with Frank again! Para­chutes is an amaz­ing record – I feel like he took ev­ery­thing that he learned from [side-project] Leather­mouth and the ex­pe­ri­ence of mak­ing [de­but al­bum] .Stomachaches., and, like I said be­fore, the el­e­va­tion in his song­writ­ing craft jumps out at you. I like that he’s fo­cused so much on singing, too; my favourite parts of the record are where ev­ery­thing has been bro­ken down and you can re­ally hear his voice. I’d ac­tu­ally love to hear him make a record that’s just him and his gui­tar.”

WHAT MOST MADE YOU LAUGH?

“It’s gotta be my son! At four, he’s al­ready de­vel­op­ing this great sense of hu­mour, which has been a re­ally mag­i­cal thing.the stuff that comes out of his mouth blows us away. He’s op­er­at­ing on a whole dif­fer­ent level of logic, and he loves to put smiles on peo­ple’s faces. And when it comes to per­fectly-timed farts, he has it down!”

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