KAMIKAZE GIRLS

FOR FANS OF: noth­ing, the Cure, Bikini Kill

Kerrang! (UK) - - NEWS -

KAMIKAZE GIRLS? THAT NAME’S COME UP QUITE A BIT RE­CENTLY…

Yeah, that’ll be the re­sult of seem­ingly non-stop tour­ing that has seen them be­come a for­mi­da­ble live act, and the re­lease of Seafoam, their bril­liant new record. If you’ve been pay­ing any at­ten­tion to the DIY scene in the UK over the last few years, you’ve prob­a­bly at least seen this Leeds lot’s name on a poster. If you haven’t? Well, it’s about to start crop­ping up a whole lot more.

THAT GOOD, EH?

Yeah. Prop­erly bril­liant.they do this mix of swirling shoegaze and fe­ro­cious punk rock that works so much bet­ter than that com­bi­na­tion has any right to.“it’s a very nat­u­ral mix of all our in­flu­ences,” says vo­cal­ist and gui­tarist Lucinda Liv­ing­stone.“we love Sonic Youth and The Cure to death, and we love early Riot Gr­rrl like L7, Sleeper and Bikini Kill. For me, dis­cov­er­ing the Riot Gr­rrl move­ment was re­ally em­pow­er­ing. It gave me the con­fi­dence and drive to re­ally be bold and brave in Kamikaze Girls.” That bold­ness has be­come a sta­ple of what they do and, after the un­de­ni­able chem­istry be­tween Lucinda and drum­mer Conor Daw­son, is the defin­ing fea­ture of the band’s sound.

GO ON THEN, TELL US ABOUT THIS EX­TRA­OR­DI­NARY CHEM­ISTRY…

Well, fun­nily enough, it turns out that play­ing in bands to­gether for eight years gives two peo­ple a lot of time to get on the same wave­length.“we seem to have a pretty good tele­pathic thing go­ing on when we play,” says Conor.we don’t nor­mally have a set list for our live shows – we just de­cide on­stage what’s com­ing up next.” It’s an odd ap­proach, but it works for them – and watch­ing that chem­istry live ev­ery night is magic.“we just feel ev­ery­thing now,” Lucinda con­tin­ues. “When we play longer sets it’s the best be­cause any­thing goes.”

NICE. AND WHAT ARE THEY, Y’KNOW, ‘ABOUT’ AS A BAND?

Kamikaze Girls are very vo­cal men­tal health ad­vo­cates. It’s a topic near and dear to them, and Lucinda’s story is one worth hear­ing. “I’ve strug­gled with my own men­tal health since I was young,” she says,“but I didn’t re­alise it at the time. I was fi­nally di­ag­nosed with de­pres­sion and anx­i­ety, but I hid it from every­one. I was up and down for years and, after some trau­matic events, I made the de­ci­sion I didn’t want to be here any­more. I’m two years on from that now and I still strug­gle day to day, but I deal with it bet­ter now.this started to show in my writ­ing and felt ther­a­peu­tic, so I started be­ing more vo­cal about it and re­alised the im­por­tance of de-stig­ma­tis­ing men­tal health. I didn’t know where to get help or what to do, but it doesn’t have to be like that.you don’t have to suf­fer alone.” Not only are Kamikaze Girls a bril­liant band, they’re also say­ing some­thing that needs to be said. Good on ’em.

“You don’t have to suf­fer alone…”

(L – R:) Conor Daw­son (drums), Lucinda Liv­ing­stone (vo­cals/gui­tar) WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW WHAT? “Sad for­ever” duo us­ing mu­sic “as a means to chal­lenge at­ti­tudes and taboos sur­round­ing men­tal health”. HEAR: Awe­some new al­bum Seafoam, which is out now on Bi

THENEWBAND YOU NEED TO HEAR NOW!

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