MF AQ

EV­ERY MONTH WE AN­SWER THE KEY FIT­NESS QUES­TIONS

Men's Fitness - - Feature Title -

Q What’sthe op­ti­mum num­ber of eggs for my morn­ing omelette?

‘You don’t want more than 50g of pro­tein in one sit­ting,’ says nu­tri­tional ther­a­pist Anthea McCourtie (younutri­tion­alther­apy.co.uk). With 6g of pro­tein per egg, that means you can have up to eight. But, cau­tions McCourtie, ‘egg yolks con­tain an omega 6 fatty acid called arachi­donic acid, which can cause in­flam­ma­tion. To bal­ance it, eat omega 3-rich foods like salmon or wal­nuts.’ Or try pro­tein guru Anna Sward’s (pro­tein­pow.com) sug­gested omelette made with two whole eggs and seven whites, which still pro­vides 33g pro­tein while keep­ing the arachi­donic acid to a min­i­mum.

Q Doridges on my nails say any­thing about my nu­tri­tion?

‘They are an in­di­ca­tor,’ says per­for­mance nutri­tion­ist Ben Coomber (ben­coomber.com). ‘Fin­ger­nails, hair, skin and eyes of­ten in­di­cate nu­tri­ent de­fi­cien­cies in your body as a re­sult of your diet.’ Ver­ti­cal fin­ger­nail lines are most com­monly due to age­ing – but they can in­di­cate a nu­tri­tional de­fi­ciency or ill­ness. ‘The best way to com­bat this is to get a hair min­eral anal­y­sis so it can be pin­pointed and fixed if needed,’ Coomber says.

Q Isit true that swear­ing as I lift helps me achieve that lit­tle bit more?

Search­ing for an ex­cuse for your foul mouth? We’ll here’s some good news for you: a study at Keele Uni­ver­sity found that swear­ing less­ened pain in many peo­ple. Just don’t get car­ried away – the study also found swear­ing too of­ten would lessen its pain-re­duc­ing ef­fect.

Q I’mstarting to train for a triathlon. Do I need to worry about bac­te­ria in open wa­ter?

While there’s some risk of con­tam­i­na­tion in any open-wa­ter lo­ca­tion, it’s gen­er­ally low in the UK. ‘Bri­tish Triathlon rec­om­mends a num­ber of pre­cau­tion­ary hy­giene mea­sures: cover any open cuts or scrapes be­fore you swim, and af­ter­wards shower in fresh wa­ter, rinse and clean all swim­ming kit in­clud­ing gog­gles and wash hands be­fore eat­ing and drink­ing,’ says Vanessa Gun­ner, Bri­tish Triathlon Fed­er­a­tion coach and per­sonal trainer (ser­pen­tine.org.uk). ‘Seek med­i­cal ad­vice if you de­velop se­vere headaches, red eyes, mus­cle pains and fa­tigue in the three weeks af­ter your swim.’

Q Readingabout UK climber James Pear­son has in­spired me to hit the out­doors. How dif­fer­ent will it be from my lo­cal climb­ing wall?

You mean are you more likely to fall to your death? ‘The main dif­fi­culty will be the men­tal as­pect. You’re go­ing from a low-stress en­vi­ron­ment with a reg­u­lated cli­mate to one that’s ex­posed to the el­e­ments,’ says Rich Hud­son, a per­sonal trainer and climb­ing wall route-set­ter (cas­tle-climb­ing.co.uk). ‘You’ll have to get used to holds that may break and don’t ad­here to set dif­fi­culty grades, as well as us­ing your safety equip­ment. Make sure you’re com­fort­able hang­ing around on the eas­ier in­door routes so your stamina is ass good as pos­si­ble.’

Open wa­ter is un­likely to be

se­ri­ously con­tam­i­nated in the UK, but it’s worth tak­ing

a few sen­si­ble pre­cau­tions

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