VOL­UME

Men's Fitness - - Trainer | How To Use Variables -

WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

The to­tal sets and reps per­formed dur­ing a work­out (or over a week). Ten sets of ten reps, for in­stance, would be con­sid­ered a high-vol­ume work­out, whereas three sets of five (or, if you’re an Olympic weightlifter, eight sets of two) is fairly low-vol­ume. It’s of­ten in­versely cor­re­lated with in­ten­sity – ie the lower the vol­ume, the higher the in­ten­sity should be, and vice versa.

WHY SHOULD YOU WORRY ABOUT IT?

Stud­ies sug­gest that, gen­er­ally, higher vol­ume is linked to im­prove­ment: if you’re strug­gling to make progress, just throw­ing in a few more sets or reps (or an­other ex­er­cise en­tirely) might be enough to change that. “The tricky part is that you need to keep the work high-qual­ity,” says trainer James Adam­son. “If you’re do­ing six arms ex­er­cises but hardly put­ting in any ef­fort on the last three, you’d be bet­ter off strip­ping things back and put­ting in more ef­fort – or up­ping the weight.” More vol­ume also means re­cov­ery is more im­por­tant.

TRY THIS

Pump up the vol­ume on squat day with a work­out from Man Of Steel trainer Michael Blevins. Put 60% of your max on the bar and aim for a to­tal of 100 reps over your work­out, do­ing 20 burpee pull-ups ev­ery time you rack the bar. Don’t plan any stair-based ac­tiv­i­ties after­wards.

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