FRE­QUENCY

Men's Fitness - - Trainer | How To Use Variables -

WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

How of­ten you train in gen­eral, or how of­ten you train a spe­cific body part. For in­stance, if you shift from a four-day legs/shoul­ders/chest/back split to a two-day full-body train­ing plan, you’re ac­tu­ally up­ping the fre­quency of your legs train­ing, de­spite go­ing to the gym less.

WHY SHOULD YOU WORRY ABOUT IT?

“It can be the best way to break through a plateau,” says trainer Ge­off Cle­ment of Pure Fit­ness gym. “If you’ve stopped mak­ing gains on your squat, or your chest won’t grow, adding an­other ses­sion for your lag­ging body part rather than pil­ing in ex­tra sets on one day won’t help.” Ex­pe­ri­enced body­builders of­ten use the low­est-fre­quency train­ing: they’ll of­ten smash a sin­gle body part with high-vol­ume, low-tempo work once a week, and then al­low it to re­cover for six days be­fore train­ing it again. If you’re a be­gin­ner or in­ter­me­di­ate lifter, though, two or three ses­sions a week might be more ben­e­fi­cial.

TRY THIS

Up your train­ing fre­quency for pull-ups by do­ing them ev­ery day. Record your best all-out set, and do half of that four to five times through­out the day. Re-test af­ter two weeks, and watch your max im­prove.

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