10 SEC­ONDS TO DOU­BLE YOUR TESTOS­TERONE FOR ROAR POWER

Men's Health (UK) - - Time -

When it comes to milk, the merry-go-round of the well­ness zeit­geist just keeps spin­ning. But while the likes of al­mond and oat milks are re­spectable, ve­gan-friendly al­ter­na­tives, much of their ben­e­fits come from be­ing for­ti­fied with vi­ta­mins and min­er­als. Dairy, how­ever, is brim­ming with both and de­liv­ers more pro­tein and healthy fats with ev­ery swig. For nu­tri­tion (and, let’s be hon­est, flavour), we’ve al­ways be­lieved in stick­ing with the herd. Un­til now.

Ac­cord­ing to a new ro­dent study*, tiger nuts – the lat­est to be turned into “milk” – could dou­ble your testos­terone lev­els. This hor­mone el­e­vates your body’s rate of pro­tein syn­the­sis, help­ing you to build mus­cle mass. The tiger nut’s im­pact may be re­lated to its high zinc con­tent, a min­eral that boosts your pro­duc­tion of testos­terone and eases re­cov­ery af­ter train­ing.

It’s also a good source of vi­ta­min C, which helps you metabolise carbs for fuel, aids your ab­sorp­tion of iron and pro­tects your body from ex­er­cise-in­duced ox­ida­tive stress. This strong nu­tri­tional pro­file makes it our new re­cov­ery drink mixer of choice – it’ll take you just 10 sec­onds to shake up a for­mi­da­ble fit­ness en­hancer. Get your claws stuck into it.

You might be more used to carv­ing faces into pump­kins than cooking them but, ac­cord­ing to sci­en­tists at Sun Yat-sen Univer­sity in China, a gen­er­ous serv­ing of the Amer­i­can au­tumn sta­ple is a pow­er­ful ally in your fight to re­duce your risk of can­cer as you age.

Pump­kins are rich in vi­ta­min A-like phy­to­chem­i­cals called carotenoids, which have been shown in pre­vi­ous stud­ies to pro­tect you against prostate can­cer. On­col­o­gists have also dis­cov­ered that these chem­i­cals lower your chances of de­vel­op­ing lethal col­orec­tal tu­mours. To­gether, the two dis­eases ac­count for al­most 28,000 deaths in the UK alone each year.

In the new study, sci­en­tists an­a­lysed the di­ets of 1,690 peo­ple, half with col­orec­tal can­cer and half with­out, fo­cus­ing specif­i­cally on each in­di­vid­ual’s daily in­take of carotenoids. They dis­cov­ered that the more of these an­tiox­i­dants the study’s sub­jects con­sumed, the lower their risk of de­vel­op­ing colon can­cer tended to be.

Car­rots and pep­pers are also rich in carotenoids, but the par­tic­i­pants who were least likely to suf­fer from the dis­ease were those whose di­ets con­tained a higher amount of be­tacryp­tox­an­thin, a com­pound that hap­pens to be plen­ti­ful in pump­kins. So, this year, for­get Hal­loween: mash your pump­kin and cook it in a pie for 45 min­utes to pro­tect your­self against some of man’s most sin­is­ter killers. We’ll have a large slice with cream, thanks.

GIVE YOUR SHAKE AN UP­DATE FOR WILD RE­SULTS IN THE GYM

PRO­TECT­ING YOUR­SELF FROM CAN­CER IS NOW AS EASY AS PIE

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