ODDSCENES

A HIS­TORY OF STRANGE EN­COUN­TERS WITH THE DOU­BLE M

Metal Hammer (UK) - - Marilyn Manson -

SEPTEM­BER 1997

Big­ger than Satan. Un­safe. When we met Man­son in a New York ho­tel fol­low­ing the re­lease of An­tichrist Su­per­star, we found him rev­el­ling in the larger-than-life life he had cre­ated for him­self. “I’m a highly evolved state of what I used to be,” he told us. chris­tian amer­ica was pan­icked.

FE­BRU­ARY 1998

In the year he re­leased Me­chan­i­cal An­i­mals, Man­son was ex­cited about bring­ing show­man­ship back to mu­sic. “Grunge killed star­dom, all the mu­si­cians wanted to be or­di­nary peo­ple, just like their fans,” he said. “We are the com­plete op­po­site; we want to bring the glam­our and per­son­al­ity back.”

may 2003

Pres­sured by his record com­pany to de­liver a suc­cess, he reinvented him­self with the help of KMFDM’s tim Skold, mak­ing the Weimar-in­flu­enced, dance­floor-filling The

Golden Age Of Grotesque. “[the al­bum] ends up say­ing, ‘I’m not ashamed that you’re en­ter­tained, but this is not just a show, it’s my life.’”

June 2012

In 2012, ahead of the re­lease of the very de­cent Born Vil­lain, we sat in a freez­ing-cold, pitch -black room with a Man­son de­ter­mined to get his ca­reer – and his life – back on track. “I was a dog shit­ting on the floor” he hissed through the dark­ness. “Now I have fangs again.”

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