A hand­ful of sid­ings?

They may be com­pact in size, but that doesn’t mean in­glenook lay­outs need to be short on am­bi­tion too, says PAUL A. LUNN.

Model Rail (UK) - - Content -

They may be small, but that doesn’t mean in­glenook lay­outs need to be short on am­bi­tion, says Paul A. Lunn.

Alan Wright’s ‘in­glenook’ shunt­ing lay­out con­cept is a rail­way mod­el­ling cor­ner­stone. It has been repli­cated and mod­i­fied many times, and con­tin­ues to find favour as part of the model rail­way plan­ner’s ar­moury of so­lu­tions. The rea­son is sim­ple: it’s quick to build and in­ter­est­ing to op­er­ate. There is, how­ever, much de­bate about what ac­tu­ally con­sti­tutes an in­glenook. Are you one of those peo­ple who is highly spe­cific about the num­ber and length of sid­ings, how many points are used and the size of the baseboard? Or are you more flam­boy­ant, per­haps adding a run-round loop or ad­di­tional sid­ings? I don’t pro­pose to go into that de­bate here. What I’ve done is far more ex­cit­ing: pro­vide you with eight in­glenook ideas based on var­i­ous pro­to­type lo­ca­tions, but the same com­mon track plan.

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