WHAT­EVER HAP­PENED TO Af­ter­mar­ket fair­ings SPECIAL OF­FER GET MCN FOR JUST £7 A MONTH SUB­SCRIBE TO­DAY Sil­ver Dream Racer re­vis­ited AND BEN­E­FIT FROM OUR FAVOURITE B IKES ON TEST AWARD-WIN­NERS FIGHT IT OUT Visit ROSSI Call the hot­line NOW OUR FAVOURITE BIKES

Get MCN for just £7 a month when you pay by Di­rect Debit Or pay £97 for the year when you pay by credit/debit card/ Paypal FACT FILE Born Early 1950s High point Late 1970s Dis­ap­peared Late 1980s ( but ac­tu­ally they’re still around) Q Never miss­ing an iss

Motorcycle News (UK) - - New Bikes - By the late 70s and early 80s, LC boys lusted after the John Mock­ett-

It’s hard to pin­point the ge­n­e­sis of the fair­ing. Stan­ley Woods had a slanted num­ber board and at­tached clear screen on his Tt-win­ning Nor­ton in 1926 while, through the 1930s, the BMW and Brough, re­spec­tively, of land speed record chasers Ernst Henne and Eric Ferni­hough gained ever-in­creas­ing aero­dy­namic body­work. The Vin­cent Black Prince of 1954 came with a full fair­ing but for clean­li­ness not speed. Un­for­tu­nately the Steve­nage firm lost money on ev­ery one and just 200 were built. How­ever, from the early 1950s a num­ber of firms, most no­tably Avon, be­gan mak­ing af­ter­mar­ket fair­ings that would fit BSAS and Tri­umphs and be­came very pop­u­lar.

Avon? I thought they made tyres? No, you’re con­fus­ing them with Avon Tyres of Melk­sham, Wilt­shire, which was sold to US firm Cooper Tires in 1997. Avon fair­ings were pro­duced from the early 1950s by fi­bre­glass spe­cial­ists the Mitchenall Broth­ers of nearby Ames­bury. With stream­lined fair­ings be­com­ing com­mon on rac­ing ma­chines, sales took off and by 1956 they were sell­ing 1500 a week.

And what about Rick­man? That came a lit­tle later. Rick­man broth­ers Don and Derek found suc­cess first mak­ing scram­bler frame kits in the 1960s and later street sport­ster kits, com­plete with bodyk­its for Ja­panese mul­tis. They stopped mak­ing bikes in 1976 to fo­cus on af­ter­mar­ket fair­ings, top boxes, crash bars and the like.

So all this was just in the UK? The USA got into them in the 1970s, too. Craig Vet­ter of Tri­umph X75 Hur­ri­cane fame made his first in 1966 fol­lowed in 1970 by the uni­ver­sal­fit Wind­jam­mer. This proved such a suc­cess with tour­ing types on their new, naked Ja­panese mul­tis that he sold over 500,000 of them.

Any­one else? By the mid-1970s dozens of fair­ing brands had sprung up. France had Mo­tode­sign, Ger­many had Krauser, Aus­tralia La Parisi­enne (fa­mous for the fair­ing on Goose’s Z1 in Mad Max).

They were start­ing to get stylish by then… Most were plain, white and vul­gar, es­pe­cially the tour­ing of­fer­ings, but the sports ones, and es­pe­cially the full bodyk­its by the likes of Rick­man and Dun­stall, were about as good as it got… de­signed ‘Pro Ams’; if you had a Honda Su­per­dream it was much im­proved with an In­vader han­dle­bar fair­ing, and there were the Ian Dyson Su­per­body kits...

The Ian Dyson what? They were the most gor­geous full body fair­ing kits for the likes of the Suzuki

PRINT ONLY DIG­I­TAL ONLY PRINT & DIG­I­TAL Ð Vet­ter sold 500,000 Wind­jam­mer fair­ings

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