Me My­self and I: Ju­lianne Moore

The award-win­ning ac­tress talks can­didly about life in the film industry

No. 1 Magazine - - CONTENTS -

She has pre­vi­ously been dubbed the most hon­est ac­tress in Hol­ly­wood and it’s re­ally no sur­prise why. From grow­ing up and re­al­is­ing what re­ally mat­ters in life, to be­ing turned down for film roles be­cause she is ‘not beau­ti­ful enough’, Ju­lianne Moore has a very in­ter­est­ing life story to share...

I don’t think I al­ways knew I wanted to act, I’m as­ton­ished by what I’ve achieved so far...

When you think about it, the steps you take to get some­where are not al­ways clear. When I was 17, I de­cided, out of the blue, that I wanted to be an ac­tor, and I was like, ‘OK. I’m go­ing to go to act­ing school, and then I’m go­ing to move to New York, and then I’m go­ing to get an agent, and then I’m go­ing to get a call­back.’ If I saw my­self sit­ting here at 52, talk­ing about my ca­reer and how I’ve been do­ing it for the last 30 years, I would be like, ‘Are you kid­ding me? It hap­pened?’

As you get older, you be­gin to re­alise what re­ally mat­ters in life...

The older you get, you have a clearer un­der­stand­ing as to what you care about, what you value, and you be­gin to think lat­er­ally and not ver­ti­cally.

Hav­ing my own fam­ily is some­thing I al­ways wanted...

I re­ally wanted a fam­ily, I re­ally wanted chil­dren and I didn’t want to com­pro­mise on that. This wasn’t a thing that I thought, ‘Oh God, kids!’ I was like, ‘This is a goal’. I’ve loved ev­ery minute of it and con­tinue to love it. It’s been re­ally won­der­ful to ex­pe­ri­ence it.

Af­ter my first mar­riage failed I was in quite a dif­fi­cult po­si­tion...

I was lonely. I don’t think I felt happy. I didn’t have the kind of per­sonal life I wanted. I’d spent my 20s work­ing hard and try­ing to get to wher­ever there was, which wasn’t re­ally any­where. It was just a job, and I re­ally wanted a fam­ily.

My mum gave me ad­vice that helped me through that time...

You have to make your per­sonal life hap­pen as much as your ca­reer. My mum al­ways told me that you can have both [ca­reer and fam­ily]. I think that it was im­por­tant to re­alise what I val­ued, what I wanted, and to find a way to make them both hap­pen.

My mother’s death had a huge im­pact on my reli­gious be­liefs...

I learned when my mother died five years ago that there is no ‘there’ there. Struc­ture, it’s all im­posed. We im­pose or­der and nar­ra­tive on every­thing in or­der to un­der­stand it. Oth­er­wise, there’s noth­ing but chaos.

I be­lieve in find­ing roles that I know I’m go­ing to en­joy...

When ac­tors say to me that they can’t get cer­tain types of parts. I al­ways tell them, “You can never say to your­self, ‘I’m just do­ing this movie be­cause it will be good for my ca­reer.’” That’s aw­ful. I’ve done things that I haven’t liked, but I’ve al­ways tried to learn from them.

Af­ter co-star­ring with Kris­ten Stew­art in Still Alice, peo­ple ask me if I’m sur­prised by her tal­ent...

I’m not sur­prised by Kris­ten at all.

I’ve known Kris­ten since she was 12 years old. What was a plea­sure for me, work­ing with her, was to wit­ness some­body that’s got that enor­mous re­serve of emo­tion at their fin­ger­tips. She has a tremen­dous amount of feel­ing. It was a joy to sit there and watch her ac­cess it.

There’s no deny­ing men are treated dif­fer­ently in this industry...

Men aren’t asked about age. Men aren’t asked about their chil­dren. Not that th­ese things aren’t im­por­tant, but I do feel like it be­comes re­duc­tive when a woman’s life be­comes, “Talk to me about your kids and how you feel about plas­tic surgery.”

I was once told that I wasn’t beau­ti­ful enough to act...

They tell you, it’s not like it’s any se­cret. You weren’t pretty enough. They went with a pret­tier girl, or some­one taller or some­one more fa­mous. Or she was bet­ter than you. You hear this again and again. And it’s true. There’s al­ways go­ing to be some­one pret­tier than you. There re­ally is.

Beauty is such a sub­jec­tive thing, so it doesn’t bother me if some­one doesn’t like the way I look...

If some­body says, ‘I don’t re­ally like the way she looks’, what the hell am I go­ing to do about it? I’m not go­ing to do any­thing. My hus­band thinks I look great, which I still find as­ton­ish­ing! So much em­pha­sis is put on what you look like, rather than who you are. What some­body has to say, what they have to con­trib­ute. Even all this whole thing about celebrity now. That celebrity is only about no­to­ri­ety and not about achieve­ment, which I think is re­ally dan­ger­ous. You have all those kids grow­ing up, say­ing “I want to be fa­mous”. You should say, “Be­ing fa­mous isn’t any­thing. What are you go­ing to be? Are you go­ing to be a sci­en­tist, a writer, a race car driver? Be some­thing. Don’t be fa­mous be­cause that’s not a goal.”

Ju­lianne says she’s known Kris­ten Stew­art since Kris­ten was 12 and she’s not sur­prised by her tal­ent.

Ju­lianne has been mar­ried to Brad Fre­undlich since 2003 ( pic­tured left). The ac­tress says she’s loved ev­ery minute of be­ing a mother ( pic­tured above with her chil­dren).

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