Trav­eller’s van­tas­tic!

Nuneaton Telegraph - - FRONT PAGE - By Peter Keenan

THE Peu­geot Trav­eller has a bit of a split per­son­al­ity. It looks like a van from the out­side, but climb in and this large peo­ple car­rier could pass for a lux­u­ri­ous sa­loon – al­beit with seat­ing for eight.

Pulling on to the drive at Keenan Tow­ers im­me­di­ately sparked the twitch­ing of neigh­bours’ cur­tains and I was met by a fam­ily del­e­ga­tion who thought I was start­ing a taxi busi­ness.

The Trav­eller is im­pos­si­ble to ig­nore and while, yes, its com­mer­cial ve­hi­cle roots are re­vealed by slab sides, it still man­ages to look rea­son­ably smart with stylish al­loy wheels, neat LED day­time run­ning lights, body-coloured bumpers and a natty grille.

There are also mas­sive slid­ing doors that can be opened and closed via the key fob pro­vid­ing easy ac­cess to the cabin, while tinted win­dows give oc­cu­pants some pri­vacy from the hoi pol­loi.

The in­te­rior di­men­sions of the mid-sized stan­dard model – there are also com­pact and long wheel­base ver­sions avail­able – mean all seats are suit­able for adults so there is no need to buy tick­ets for the back-row lot­tery.

The pow­ered mas­sag­ing front seats proved a shock for one pal who ac­ci­den­tally pressed the but­ton get­ting into the MPV – but it is a nice touch that is very wel­come on long jour­neys.

The cen­tre con­sole’s star per­former is a seven-inch colour touch­screen giv­ing ac­cess to good­ies such as the dig­i­tal ra­dio, smart­phone con­nec­tiv­ity and sat nav.

A head-up dis­play in the Al­lure model gives a jet fighter feel to what is in essence a cargo plane, while the £38,805 model also gets leather up­hol­stery and heated front seats as well as dual-zone cli­mate con­trol, cruise con­trol, au­to­matic head­lights and wipers, plus pow­ered mir­rors.

Plenty of safety kit is in­cluded so the Trav­eller re­ceives a re­as­sur­ing five-star rat­ing.

The boot is a de­cent size, even with all seats in place, and there is plenty of cubby hole room.

The 2.0-litre diesel en­gine driv­ing the front wheels of the Trav­eller I tested is one of two oil burner op­tions with four power out­puts.

The 150bhp mo­tor un­der the bon­net of my Trav­eller, linked to a six-speed man­ual gear­box that wasn’t as slick as Peu­geot’s usual ef­forts, does a good job of pow­er­ing what is a big beast.

It gives the Trav­eller a re­spectable 0-62mph time of 11 sec­onds and makes it adept at over­tak­ing.

Fuel economy is sur­pris­ingly fru­gal with stop-start tech­nol­ogy prov­ing its worth when you are stuck in traf­fic while car­bon diox­ide emis­sions of 139g/km are com­pet­i­tive, en­sur­ing tax bills for pri­vate and com­pany car buy­ers are af­ford­able.

The Trav­eller’s foun­da­tions al­low car-like re­sponses when it comes to ride and han­dling.

So humps and hol­lows are treated with dis­dain en­sur­ing oc­cu­pants are cos­seted in the spa­cious cabin. My one quib­ble would be with the steer­ing which is a touch vague – mak­ing twist­ing coun­try lanes a bit of a trial – al­though the turn­ing cir­cle is ex­cel­lent.

You would think park­ing would also be a chore - but my wife was mem­o­rably amazed when I man­aged to eas­ily slot it into the tight­est of spots, aided and abet­ted by park­ing sen­sors and cam­era, as well as large door mir­rors.

For any­one con­sid­er­ing start­ing an ex­ec­u­tive shut­tle busi­ness or re­quir­ing an eight-seater fam­ily van with prac­ti­cal­ity and com­fort guar­an­teed – then the Trav­eller is one for the short­list.

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