FAHR’N AUF DER AU­TO­BAHN

Octane - - LETTERS -

THE HANDS around the beau­ti­ful E-type steer­ing wheel on the cover of Oc­tane 150 show a very tight grip in­deed, and right­fully so.

I bought my 1961 E-type Roadster 30 years ago, sim­ply be­cause it was the fastest car I could af­ford at that time. It has al­ways been reg­is­tered and on the road, apart from the times when it is be­ing re­paired.

It now lives in our hol­i­day home near Mu­nich and is reg­u­larly driven in Bavaria on the au­to­bahn, cruis­ing at 100mph and with short dashes up to 120mph. Above 120 it be­comes quite stren­u­ous but up to that speed it be­haves well, al­most like a mod­ern car. The most fright­en­ing mo­ment I had was when the cen­tral catch for the hood popped open at about 110mph, and of course in rain it is like nav­i­gat­ing a sub­ma­rine and you need a lot of tow­els to wipe the in­side of the wind­screen and your glasses. The boot also pops open some­times, re­sult­ing in a loss of lug­gage – this an­noyed Alan Clark ages ago and no garage has yet been able to fix it.

Over such a long time of own­er­ship on the road – not on a toyshelf – the car grows with you, mean­ing it now has bet­ter brakes, bet­ter cool­ing, bet­ter shocks and, most im­por­tant, a fifth gear, but still the stan­dard 3.8-litre en­gine. I know that orig­i­nal­ity freaks will frown but it copes with mod­ern traf­fic much bet­ter and I do not know of any sim­i­lar Ger­man E-type owner who has not at least changed the gear­ing, to re­duce the revs when driv­ing on the au­to­bahn.

Thank you very much for the lovely ar­ti­cle – it brought me great plea­sure. GERT SCHROEDER-FINCKH DUS­SEL­DORF, GER­MANY

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.