AVEY TARE

Dizzy­ing space folk from An­i­mal Col­lec­tive hon­cho.

Prog - - Intro - RH

As Avey Tare, David Port­ner has been the un­of­fi­cial head of ex­per­i­men­tal art pop types An­i­mal Col­lec­tive for the past 14 years. He’s been en­gaged in var­i­ous off­shoot projects in the in­terim too, ei­ther with the likes of David Grubbs and Black Dice or, as he did in 2013, form­ing his own trio, Avey Tare’s Slasher Flicks. This sec­ond solo al­bum comes seven years af­ter de­but Down There and is de­scribed in the press blurb as “an elec­tro-acous­tic move­ment through leaves, rocks and dust.” It’s not a bad syn­op­sis of Eu­ca­lyp­tus’ myr­iad charms, ex­plain­ing Tare’s in­tu­itive ap­proach to free-flow­ing songs that seem to move un­con­sciously through a va­ri­ety of moods and set­tings. AC band­mate Josh Dibb is aboard too, as are var­i­ous others, chiefly or­ches­tra­tor Eyvind Kang and ex-Dirty Pro­jec­tors singer (and Slasher Flicks mem­ber) An­gel Der­adoo­rian. Noth­ing quite em­bod­ies the en­dear­ing strange­ness of Eu­ca­lyp­tus as Jack­son 5, whose left­field pedal steel prog pop is sud­denly rup­tured by a sub­lime melody that dis­ap­pears just as quickly. Gen­tle per­cus­sive drones form back­drops to th­ese tunes, dive-bombed by acous­tic trills, buzzes and back­wards ef­fects, cre­at­ing a song suite that, for all its rich ex­ot­ica, never feels over­done.

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