Slaves’ Laurie and Isaac re­veal the plat­ters that mat­ter to them

THE KENT PUNK DUO RE­VEAL THE RECORDS THAT MADE THEM WHO THEY ARE.

Q (UK) - - Contents -

THE CLASH COM­BAT ROCK (CB S , 1982)

Laurie Vin­cent: “I lis­tened to Lon­don Call­ing loads grow­ing up, but this in my opin­ion is the best Clash al­bum be­cause of the range of experimentation. To do a record like that late on in your ca­reer is really dif­fi­cult and tracks like Straight To Hell are just in­cred­i­ble.” Isaac Hol­man: “I lis­tened to it a lot when I was a kid too. I’d hear the bands my dad was lis­ten­ing to, then would just buy one CD by them. This one was the cheap­est Clash al­bum in the shop, so it be­came my favourite by ac­ci­dent.”

THE WATERBOYS FISH­ER­MAN’S BLUES (E NSIGN RE CORDS , 1988)

LV: “Isaac in­tro­duced me to their mu­sic a year ago so I down­loaded this al­bum and have lis­tened to it twice a day ever since. It’s in­cred­i­ble! I love the fact they’ve got ab­so­lutely mas­sive songs like U2 or Oa­sis but aren’t as widely known. The tune Fish­er­man’s Blues is really up­lift­ing and I love the Celtic in­flu­ence; the man­dolin and the fid­dle. It’s a joy­ous sound. Have The Waterboys left a mark on Slaves? Maybe in our lyrics. They paint a very vis­ual pic­ture and that’s some­thing Isaac does for us. Plus you have to ad­mit you need a bit of a cho­rus some­times.”

BAX­TER DURY HAPPY SOUP (RE GAL RE CORDI NGS , 2011)

IH: “It was ac­tu­ally my mum who in­tro­duced me to this. She’s on the pulse with new mu­sic. It’s the per­fect happy-sad record. It’s great for look­ing out of a train win­dow on a rainy day and hav­ing a think. It’s re­lat­able to what we do, but it’s softer and more melodic. Laurie and I are ob­sessed with it.” LV: “It’s one of those al­bums that ev­ery­one

I play it to loves.” IH: “He’s a wicked guy as well. He fea­tures on our track Steer Clear. Such a lovely bloke: down-to-earth and funny.”

THE STREETS ORIG­I­NAL PI­RATE MA­TE­RIAL (679 RECORDI NGS/ LOCKE D ON, 2002)

IH: “It’s a cliché to say it, but this al­bum changed my life. My dad was ob­sessed with it too so we lis­tened to it on ev­ery car jour­ney. It’s a very im­por­tant al­bum to me. It gave me a re­al­i­sa­tion of how great im­per­fec­tions can be. It’s per­fect as it is.” LV: “Mike [ Skin­ner’s] a com­plete one-off. I didn’t re­alise he was from Birm­ing­ham orig­i­nally be­cause he’s got this mock cock­ney ac­cent. He’s a bril­liant ex­port from Eng­land. Peo­ple would ask him how he got a vo­cal sound and he’d just go: ‘I had a cold.’”

DIZZEE RAS­CAL BOY IN DA COR­NER (X L RE CORDI NGS , 2003)

IH: “I was into hip-hop and rock when I first heard [ sin­gle] Jus’ A Ras­cal and I loved the gui­tar on it so I knew I had to get the al­bum. I cy­cled to HMV in Tun­bridge Wells, bought it, then went straight back to my room, sat in front of the CD player and lis­tened to it over and over. I’d never heard any­thing like it. There’s a real charisma to Dizzee’s voice and a lot of the beats are by Wiley. I don’t think any­thing has touched it in terms of grime. I had the in­stru­men­tals on my phone and me and my friends would rap along to it in the play­ground.”

JAMIE T PANIC PRE­VEN­TION (VI RGI N, 2007)

LV: “This was for me what Boy In Da Cor­ner was for Isaac: it made me re­alise you could cross gen­res. I re­mem­ber see­ing the video for If You Got The Money on MTV2 and just go­ing: ‘Woah! He sounds a bit like me, he doesn’t sing that good but he’s rap­ping and it’s catchy.’ That was it, I got the al­bum and put it on re­peat. When we toured to­gether re­cently I asked him so many ques­tions: ‘What’s this skit about? What does that mean?’ This is the al­bum that has come out in my life­time and blown rock mu­sic away. If you don’t know it, you need to lis­ten to it.”

THE STROKES IS THIS IT ( ROU GH TRADE , 2001)

IH: “I first heard The Mod­ern Age on a skate video. I thought the cover was so naughty when I was a kid so I had to cy­cle over to Ton­bridge, the other town near me, so I wouldn’t get spot­ted get­ting it. I felt naughty buy­ing it. From start to fin­ish I know ev­ery track, word for word. It was funny be­cause within a year of this com­ing out, ev­ery­one I knew was dress­ing like them. I love the vo­cal sound on it – that dis­torted, nasty vo­cal. I’ve al­ways tried to get it for my­self. I ref­er­ence this al­bum a lot when I’m try­ing to find a sound I want.”

EMINEM THE EMINEM SHOW (AFTE RMATH E NTE RTAI NM E NT/ I NTE RSCOPE RECORDS, 2002)

LV: “I was eight when his first few records came out so this is the first al­bum of his that I got. It was on my Christ­mas list and my par­ents bought me the clean ver­sion – he cen­sors all the swear­ing with cat and dog noises. Its hu­mour has in­spired Slaves. We’ve had re­views say­ing: ‘They don’t know if they’re a punk band, a po­lit­i­cal band, a com­edy act, blah, blah,” That’s per­fect, it means we’re an­noy­ing you! That’s ex­actly what Eminem does. He’s a hor­ri­ble lit­tle brat do­ing what he wants.”

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