Bee pollen

Fab or fad?

Runner's World (UK) - - Warm ups/ fuel -

WHAT IS IT? Grains of pollen packed into balls by bees, along with honey or nec­tar. De­scribed as a ‘com­plete food’ be­cause it con­tains pro­tein, fat and carbs, along with vi­ta­mins, min­er­als and abun­dant an­tiox­i­dant polyphe­nols.

WHY TAKE IT Health claims range from weight loss and im­proved ath­letic per­for­mance to im­mune sup­port, gas­tric health and bone preser­va­tion. A 2010 study re­ported a mild anti-in­flam­ma­tory ef­fect, but much of the re­search to date has been con­ducted on an­i­mals, of­ten rats. Ear­lier this year, Pol­ish re­searchers con­cluded that bee pollen shows prom­ise, but good-qual­ity hu­man stud­ies are needed.

ANY DAN­GERS? Di­verse sources make it tricky to guar­an­tee nu­tri­ent con­tent or safety. There have been some re­ports of al­ler­gic re­ac­tions, in­clud­ing ana­phy­laxis.

THE VER­DICT Some good buzz but more re­search is needed.

30

THE MIN­I­MUM NUM­BER OF GRAMS OF PRO­TEIN PER MEAL THAT PRE­SERVE MUS­CLE MASS AND STRENGTH IN MAS­TERS EN­DURANCE ATH­LETES. 1

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