KICK THE BAD HABITS

Su­per­glued to the sofa? These com­mon rou­tines and habits may be sap­ping your will to lace up and get out there day af­ter day. Time to ditch them

Runner's World (UK) - - Motivation -

YOU SKIP BREAK­FAST

Maybe you’re not hun­gry, maybe you’re too busy, but it’s a bad move if you want to run later, ac­cord­ing to a study pub­lished in the Amer­i­can Jour­nal of Clin­i­cal Nu­tri­tion. The re­searchers found that break­fast-eaters were more likely to ex­er­cise (and burned nearly 200 more calo­ries dur­ing the morn­ing) than those who skipped break­fast. For an en­er­gis­ing brekkie that keeps you feel­ing ready to run all morn­ing, aim for slow-burn­ing pro­tein and fat; ba­con and eggs, av­o­ca­dos, cheese and yoghurt. Don’t tell us that doesn’t sound good.

YOU TAKE YOUR OWN TWEET TIME

There’s only so much time in the day, so the min­utes (or even the hours) you spend on so­cial me­dia take away from the time you spend in your run­ning shoes. Re­search at the Univer­sity of Ul­ster found that the more time study par­tic­i­pants spent on so­cial me­dia, the less likely they were to ex­er­cise.

YOU WORK TO LIVE

Get­ting your miles in is eas­ier when you’re not teth­ered to your desk. When you’re on email all day, wor­ried about dead­lines and liv­ing in fear of your boss, your train­ing sched­ule may get shunted onto the back burner. A study at Rio de Janeiro State Univer­sity, Brazil, found that the more job stress peo­ple ex­pe­ri­ence, the less likely they are to ex­er­cise. If work reg­u­larly robs you of the will to get out there, sched­ule your run for the morn­ing, be­fore work takes over and ru­ins ev­ery­thing.

YOU’RE A NIGHT OWL

If you think a hard and fast bed­time is only for the most com­pli­ant of tod­dlers, think again. ‘A good work­out starts the night be­fore,’ says coach and per­sonal trainer Aja Davis. ‘If you’re watch­ing TV or on your com­puter un­til late in the night, you won’t feel re­stored and refreshed the next day.’ Poor sleep wreaks havoc on the body and the mind. It leaves you more sus­cep­ti­ble to ill­ness and in­jury, and re­duces mo­ti­va­tion, found re­search at Saar­land Univer­sity, Ger­many.

YOU DON'T TAKE BREAKS

You’ve prob­a­bly heard that ‘sit­ting is the new smok­ing’. There are nu­mer­ous con­vinc­ing rea­sons why park­ing you’re der­riere for eight hours plus a day is bad news for your health, and re­search pub­lished in the Bri­tish Jour­nal of Sports Medicine found that those who do so are less likely to ex­er­cise. To com­bat the ill ef­fects, take fre­quent breaks to stand up, stretch and move around.

YOU TAKE TWO PAINKILLERS AND WAIT TILL THE MORN­ING

Hang­over, neck pain, sore knee...deal­ing with pain can be­come a daily habit that stops you from get­ting your heart rate up, but try this mo­ti­va­tional tonic: ex­er­cise. Re­search pub­lished in Medicine & Sci­ence in Sports & Ex­er­cise found that 30 min­utes of aer­o­bic ex­er­cise makes us more tol­er­ant of pain and dis­com­fort in the long term.

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