Song­bird Cara’s nar­row es­cape

Scottish Daily Mail - - Jan Moir -

SO HAR­VEY WE­IN­STEIN is off to a sex ad­dic­tion clinic, keen to the last to prop­a­gate the il­lu­sion that he is some­how the vic­tim.

Even on his way to the air­port, he was still un­der the delu­sion that he has done noth­ing wrong. ‘I am not do­ing OK. I need help. Sec­ond chance,’ he said.

His treat­ment for sex ad­dic­tion is part of the nar­ra­tive Hollywood de­mands of the fallen. I am sick, I need help, it wasn’t my fault, oh, mind my demons on the way out.

No mat­ter what the wrong­do­ing might be — drugs, drink, that pesky ad­dic­tion to pre­scrip­tion painkillers — the bad per­son must seek a cure, and then for­give­ness. It’s mostly hum­bug, of course. Does sex ad­dic­tion even ex­ist? We­in­stein seems ad­dicted to power and con­trol, if any­thing. And he used that to mo­lest young women for 30 years.

Ther­apy is a good ex­cuse to stay out of jail, for the time be­ing.

Actress Cara Delev­ingne (pic­tured with We­in­stein’s wife Ge­orgina Chap­man) told how he tried to kiss her, but she dodged his ad­vances and sang to dis­tract his at­ten­tion. I ad­mire her pluck!

De­spite the re­buff, he still cast her in his film, and she was queasily grate­ful for the part — and her nar­row es­cape.

Not all of the un­for­tu­nate women who crossed his path have been so lucky.

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