Shock­ing new claims over stolen dossier

For­mer as­sis­tant chief constable speaks out

The Courier & Advertiser (Angus and The Mearns Edition) - - Front Page - EX­CLU­SIVE by Ste­fan Morkis

PO­LICE SCOT­LAND did not prop­erly in­ves­ti­gate the theft of a se­cret dossier on Tay­side Po­lice’s last chief constable, the se­nior of­fi­cer who wrote the bomb­shell doc­u­ment has claimed.

In an ex­clu­sive in­ter­view with The Courier, for­mer as­sis­tant chief constable An­gela Wil­son re­vealed she will make an of­fi­cial com­plaint about the mat­ter to the Scot­tish Po­lice Author­ity.

The doc­u­ment, which con­tained al­le­ga­tions about Chief Constable Justine Cur­ran, was in Ms Wil­son’s of­fice in a se­cure cor­ri­dor at the Bell Street head­quar­ters in Dundee.

Although only a few staff had ac­cess to the cor­ri­dor, a nine-month in­ves­ti­ga­tion was un­able to iden­tify a cul­prit or re­cover the dossier, stolen in April 2013. Ms Wil­son in­sisted the cul­prit “was not some­body ex­ter­nal”. smorkis@the­courier.co.uk

THE THEFT of a se­cret dossier on the last chief constable of Tay­side Po­lice was not in­ves­ti­gated prop­erly, the woman who com­piled the bomb­shell doc­u­ment has claimed.

An­gela Wil­son was the as­sis­tant chief constable of Tay­side Po­lice when Justine Cur­ran was chief constable.

She com­piled the dossier on her su­pe­ri­ors af­ter a raft of anony­mous com­plaints were made about the pro­fes­sion­al­ism of Ms Cur­ran and her deputy.

Now, a week af­ter re­tir­ing from the force, she has re­vealed for the first time how she felt be­trayed by the way the in­ves­ti­ga­tion into the theft from her of­fice was han­dled.

Ms Wil­son con­firmed she is lodg­ing an of­fi­cial com­plaint with watch­dog the Scot­tish Po­lice Author­ity (SPA) about the case.

In an ex­clu­sive in­ter­view with The Courier, she claims many within Tay­side Po­lice felt Ms Cur­ran was more con­cerned with her next job than do­ing the best job for the peo­ple ofTay­side.

Ms Cur­ran’s ten­ure as chief constable of Tay­side was dogged by al­le­ga­tions of mis­con­duct, cen­tring on un­pro­fes­sional texts she sent to her per­sonal as­sis­tant about the size of a col­league’s man­hood.

Mem­bers of the now de­funct Tay­side Po­lice Joint Board were also sent an anony­mous doc­u­ment from “Friends of Tay­side Po­lice” re­gard­ing the al­legedly un­pro­fes­sional be­hav­iour of Ms Cur­ran and then deputy chief constable Gor­don Scob­bie.

The Courier re­vealed in May 2013 that a dossier col­lect­ing th­ese al­le­ga­tions had been com­piled by Ms Wil­son but had been stolen from her of­fice— shortly be­fore the cre­ation of Po­lice Scot­land and the de­par­tures of Ms Cur­ran and Mr Scob­bie.

Only a few em­ploy­ees of Tay­side Po­lice knew the code to ac­cess the se­cure cor­ri­dor where the dossier was kept locked up in MsWil­son’s of­fice.

But a nine-month in­ves­ti­ga­tion was un­able to find a cul­prit or re­cover the dossier, de­spite of­fi­cers from Strath­clyde be­ing brought in toTay­side to head up the probe.

“It’s public knowl­edge there were a num­ber of com­plaints re­gard­ing Justine Cur­ran and I be­lieve Mr Scob­bie, which were anony­mous com­plaints that came from a num­ber of dif­fer­ent sources, I be­lieve,” Ms Wil­son said.

“Just be­cause some­thing is anony­mous does not mean it is not true.

“In my view, par­tic­u­larly in the ser­vice, peo­ple will re­port things anony­mously be­cause they are fear­ful of stand­ing up and be­ing counted.

“There’s no way I would have spo­ken out be­fore leav­ing the ser­vice for fear that some­body would in­ter­pret it as be­ing a dis­ci­plinary of­fence.”

Ms Wil­son said the orig­i­nal com­plaints about the be­hav­iour of both Ms Cur­ran and Mr Scob­bie were not taken se­ri­ously enough.

“In my view those com­plaints were never fully and prop­erly in­ves­ti­gated. Maybe that was for po­lit­i­cal rea­sons be­cause we were about to come to the end of Tay­side Po­lice? They maybe thought what’s the point?

“It’s also public knowl­edge that a file was taken from my of­fice. That has never been de­tected but I can tell you it was not some­body ex­ter­nal.

“That file did re­late to com­plaints against Justine Cur­ran and Gor­don Scob­bie.

“And I have made a com­plaint to the SPA about the qual­ity of that in­ves­ti­ga­tion.”

Mv Wil­son said the lack of in­ter­est in pur­su­ing the theft of the dossier soured hey re­la­tion­ship with the po­lice.

“What that did foy me, it ac­tu­ally made me feel quite un­well be­cause I felt my trust in the in­tegrity of the ser­vice was eroded.”

Mv Wil­son vaid many se­nior of­fi­cers in Tay­side were un­happy with the lead­er­ship of Justine Cur­ran and Gor­don Scob­bie.

“I don’t think they were mo­ti­vated by de­liv­er­ing the best ser­vice they could to Tay­side Po­lice,” she said. “I think they both saw it as a step­ping stone to other things.

“Did I find it dif­fi­cult to work with them? Yes.”

At­tempts to reach Mv Cur­ran yes­ter­day via Hum­ber­side Po­lice were un­suc­cess­ful and My Scob­bie could not be reached for com­ment.

Pic­ture: Steve MacDougall.

A week af­ter re­tir­ing from the po­lice, for­mer as­sis­tant chief constable An­gela Wil­son has re­vealed how she felt be­trayed by the way the in­ves­ti­ga­tion into the theft from her of­fice was han­dled.

onlu 0 few em­plouees of t0u­side 1olice knew the code to 0ccess the se­cure cor­ri­dor 0t Bell Street gQ, where the dossier w0s kept locked up in ns uil­son’s of­fice.

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