Scot­land is demo­cratic

The Courier & Advertiser (Dundee Edition) - - COMMENT -

Sir, - I worry about the so­ci­ety we live in if some of your read­ers ac­tu­ally be­lieve what they are say­ing is true.

Take your cor­re­spon­dent Jill Steven­son of Ed­in­burgh for ex­am­ple. She calls the Scot­tish Gov­ern­ment a dic­ta­tor­ship.

Does she have any un­der­stand­ing as to what a dic­ta­tor­ship ac­tu­ally is, in com­par­i­son to one party, demo­crat­i­cally elected in pref­er­ence to the other five or more on the bal­lot paper?

She can­not seem to grasp the most ba­sic of dif­fer­ences.

China and North Korea where there are no free elec­tions are oneparty states.

Scot­land holds demo­cratic elec­tions ev­ery four or five years with mul­ti­ple par­ties and in­di­vid­ual can­di­dates stand­ing to rep­re­sent con­stituen­cies.

This is not a one-party state. Scot­land does not have power over many of the things that a dic­ta­to­rial or power-pre­serv­ing regime would re­quire.

For ex­am­ple, Scot­land does not con­trol the se­cu­rity ser­vices, for­eign pol­icy, pass­ports and im­mi­gra­tion, anti-ter­ror­ism laws, wel­fare and the usual stuff that re­ally en­sures the pop­u­la­tion is con­trolled. Rod Sel­bie. 45 Sil­ver Birch Drive, Bal­lumbie, Dundee.

Scot­land holds demo­cratic elec­tions ev­ery four or five years with mul­ti­ple par­ties and in­di­vid­ual can­di­dates stand­ing to rep­re­sent con­stituen­cies

North Korea leader Kim Jong Un

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