The Guardian

Trump to say he is 2024’s ‘pre­sump­tive nom­i­nee’

- Martin Pen­gelly US Elections · U.S. News · US Politics · Arts · Politics · Elections · Republican Party Politics · Donald Trump · Florida · Republican Party (United States) · White House · Joe Biden · Democratic Party (United States) · Twitter · Oval Office · United States of America · United States Senate · Mitch McConnell · McConnell · Suffolk University · Boston · Boston · Washington · Courtauld Gallery · London · Paul Cézanne · Wassily Kandinsky · Peter Paul Rubens · Switzerland · Georg Baselitz · Joseph Beuys · Vincent van Gogh · Édouard Manet · Jason Miller · Steve Scalise · Folies Bergères

Don­ald Trump will re­port­edly tell the Con­ser­va­tive Po­lit­i­cal Ac­tion Con­fer­ence in Florida this week that he is the Repub­li­cans’ pre­sump­tive 2024 nom­i­nee for pres­i­dent.

Trump will ad­dress the CPAC on Sun­day, his sub­ject be­ing the fu­ture of the party he took over in the 2016 pri­mary then led from the White House through four tu­mul­tuous years.

Yes­ter­day, cit­ing anony­mous sources, the news site Ax­ios re­ported his plan to as­sume the man­tle of chal­lenger to Joe Bi­den – or an­other Demo­crat, should the 78-year-old pres­i­dent de­cide not to run again.

An un­named “long­time ad­viser” was quoted as say­ing Trump’s speech to the rightwing event would be a “show of force” with the mes­sage: “I may not have Twit­ter or the Oval Of­fice, but I’m still in charge.”

The former pres­i­dent’s close ad­viser Ja­son Miller said: “Trump ef­fec­tively is the Repub­li­can party. The only chasm is be­tween Belt­way in­sid­ers and grass­roots Repub­li­cans around the coun­try. When you at­tack Pres­i­dent Trump, you’re at­tack­ing the Repub­li­can grass­roots.”

Thou­sands have left the party since the US Capi­tol riot of 6 Jan­uary, which Trump in­cited in his at­tempt to over­turn an elec­tion de­feat he has not yet con­ceded, and in which five peo­ple in­clud­ing a po­lice of­fi­cer died.

Trump lost his Twit­ter ac­count, his favoured means of com­mu­ni­ca­tion through­out his time in of­fice, and ac­cess to other so­cial me­dia over his lies and in­flam­ma­tory be­hav­iour be­fore, dur­ing and af­ter the mob at­tack on Congress.

Polling of Repub­li­cans who have not left the party, how­ever, shows the former pres­i­dent with a clear lead over a range of po­ten­tial 2024 can­di­dates, sup­port­ive of him or not, in a no­tional pri­mary.

Ten mem­bers of the House voted to im­peach Trump a sec­ond time over the Capi­tol at­tack and seven sen­a­tors voted with Democrats to con­vict him. That was short by 10 votes of the ma­jor­ity needed, but it made it the most bi­par­ti­san im­peach­ment ever.

The Se­nate Repub­li­can leader, Mitch McCon­nell, voted to ac­quit but then turned on Trump, brand­ing him re­spon­si­ble for events at the Capi­tol. But House lead­ers have not fol­lowed suit, as they deal with vo­cal ex­trem­ists in their cau­cus and the party base.

As Trump lashed out at McCon­nell, call­ing him “a dour, sullen and un­smil­ing po­lit­i­cal hack”, so Repub­li­cans in the House and Se­nate who turned against Trump have been cen­sured by state par­ties and re­ported vit­riol aimed at them from the party grass­roots – and even fam­ily mem­bers.

Trump’s grip on his party is clear. New polling from Suf­folk University in Bos­ton and USA To­day showed 46% of Trump vot­ers would fol­low him if he formed his own party, while 42% said his im­peach­ment had strength­ened their sup­port.

The same poll said 58% of Trump vot­ers sub­scribed to an out­right con­spir­acy the­ory: that the Capi­tol riot was “mostly a [left­wing] an­tifain­spired at­tack that only in­volved a few Trump sup­port­ers”.

In re­al­ity, many of more than 250 in­di­vid­u­als charged over the at­tack have been found to have links to far­right groups.

On Sun­day a key mem­ber of the House lead­er­ship, Steve Scalise, re­peat­edly re­fused to say that Trump had lost the elec­tion or bore re­spon­si­bil­ity for the mob at­tack on the Capi­tol.

The former Repub­li­can strate­gist Stu­art Stevens said Scalise was “say­ing that Amer­ica isn’t a democ­racy. That’s be­come the new stan­dard of the Repub­li­can party. Not since 1860s has a large part of the coun­try re­fused to ac­cept [an] elec­tion. The Repub­li­can party is an anti-demo­cratic force.”

Ax­ios’s source re­port­edly said: “Much like 2016, we’re tak­ing on Wash­ing­ton again.”

A “hugely im­por­tant” col­lec­tion of mod­ern draw­ings, which the head of the Cour­tauld Gallery says push the bound­aries of what the art form can be, has been gifted to the gallery.

The Lon­don gallery said the 25 works by artists in­clud­ing Cézanne, Kandin­sky and Klee were one of the most sig­nif­i­cant gifts of art it had re­ceived in a gen­er­a­tion. They were as­sem­bled by the col­lec­tor Howard Kar­shan, who died in 2017, and pre­sented in his mem­ory by his widow, Linda, an artist her­self.

Ernst Vegelin, head of the gallery, said the gift was “im­por­tant be­yond its size” be­cause of the gaps it filled and the na­ture of the works.

The gallery has one of the na­tion’s great draw­ing col­lec­tions, with 7,000 works by artists who in­clude Leonardo, Rem­brandt and Rubens.

“It is also one of the most ac­tive col­lec­tions in terms of ex­hi­bi­tions and dis­plays and loans,” said Vegelin. “De­spite that, our rep­re­sen­ta­tion of draughts­man­ship in the 20th cen­tury is hes­i­tant so this gives us a fan­tas­tic new chap­ter in the col­lec­tion and a great ba­sis for fu­ture growth.

“Other than Cézanne, none of the artists in the gift are in the col­lec­tion at all. No Kandin­sky, no Klee and so forth, so this brings them in, where they be­long.”

There are draw­ings by great names but also “as­ton­ish­ing and rev­e­la­tory” works by artists less well known to the wider pub­lic. For ex­am­ple, an ex­plo­sively colour­ful work by the Cal­i­for­nian ab­stract ex­pres­sion­ist Sam Fran­cis; and ab­stract works by Henri Michaux made while he was trip­ping on mesca­line.

There are also two works by the Swiss artist Louis Sout­ter, who was put in a home for el­derly men when he was 52. Af­ter he de­vel­oped os­teoarthri­tis, Sout­ter would dip his fin­gers in ink and work di­rectly on pa­per.

The re­sults were as­ton­ish­ing, said Vegelin, de­scrib­ing one work, which has fig­ures sway­ing frieze-like, as “a drop-dead masterpiec­e”, adding: “When I first saw it, it stopped me lit­er­ally in my tracks.”

Vegelin said the art­works made a case for draw­ing on its own terms, not just as prepara­tory stud­ies for paint­ings. “It is not a col­lec­tion that some­one has put to­gether from a ref­er­ence book. It is a col­lec­tion with real edge and bite and char­ac­ter that re­ally gets un­der the skin of draw­ing as an art form.”

The works, which also in­clude ex­am­ples by Cy Twombly, Ge­org

Baselitz and Joseph Beuys, were “gutsy, full-on draw­ing as self­ex­pres­sion, re­ally push­ing the bound­aries of the medium and ex­plor­ing the edges of draughts­man­ship”.

Linda Kar­shan said her hus­band was as pas­sion­ate about study­ing his draw­ings as he was about col­lect­ing them. “He care­fully po­si­tioned them on the walls around him, so as to be able to have his favourites within sight.

“These are the draw­ings that make up the Kar­shan gift. At the Cour­tauld they will find their nat­u­ral home, where they can be in the pub­lic eye while be­ing stud­ied for gen­er­a­tions to come, echo­ing the role these draw­ings played within our fam­ily for over 50 years,” she said.

The Cour­tauld is home to one of Europe’s great­est art col­lec­tions, with mas­ter­pieces that in­clude Van Gogh’s Self-Por­trait with Ban­daged Ear and Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère. The draw­ings will go on dis­play when it re­opens in late 2021 fol­low­ing a £50m, three-year ren­o­va­tion pro­ject.

Vegelin said both Kar­shan and the gallery wanted peo­ple to be in­spired by the works.

“What is this go­ing to do for peo­ple for decades to come? What will be the serendip­i­tous mo­ments when a young stu­dent sees the Sout­ter and the scales fall from their eyes and they re­alise what they can do, what the pos­si­bil­i­ties are?”

‘At the Cour­tauld they will find their nat­u­ral home, where they can be in the pub­lic eye’ Linda Kar­shan, artist Widow of Howard, be­low left

 ?? PHO­TO­GRAPH: JOE RAE­DLE/GETTY ?? Don­ald Trump will ad­dress an in­flu­en­tial US con­ser­va­tive con­fer­ence in Florida on Sun­day
PHO­TO­GRAPH: JOE RAE­DLE/GETTY Don­ald Trump will ad­dress an in­flu­en­tial US con­ser­va­tive con­fer­ence in Florida on Sun­day
 ?? PHO­TO­GRAPHS: COUR­TAULD IN­STI­TUTE ?? ▼ Be­low left, Louis Sout­ter’s Beat (verso) and, be­low right, Sam Fran­cis’s Red, Black & Blue ▲ Wass­ily Kandin­sky’s Un­ti­tled (1916) be­comes the Cour­tauld’s first work by the Rus­sian artist
PHO­TO­GRAPHS: COUR­TAULD IN­STI­TUTE ▼ Be­low left, Louis Sout­ter’s Beat (verso) and, be­low right, Sam Fran­cis’s Red, Black & Blue ▲ Wass­ily Kandin­sky’s Un­ti­tled (1916) be­comes the Cour­tauld’s first work by the Rus­sian artist
 ??  ??
 ??  ??
 ??  ?? ▼ Paul Cézanne’s work Moun­tain­ous Land­scape (circa 1885-90) was in­cluded in the Kar­shan gift
▼ Paul Cézanne’s work Moun­tain­ous Land­scape (circa 1885-90) was in­cluded in the Kar­shan gift
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