CHOICE OF THE WEEK AHEAD:

The Herald - Arts - - Arts -

1 DUNEDIN CON­SORT QUEEN’S HALL, ED­IN­BURGH, TO­DAY, 7PM; ED­IN­BURGH ROYAL CHORAL UNION ST CUTH­BERT’S CHURCH, TO­DAY,7PM

It is Palm Sun­day to­mor­row and in Ed­in­burgh there is a bat­tle of the Pas­sions. The leaner team is the award­win­ning Dunedins, who have fol­lowed up their prize-win­ning Mes­siah with a new three-disc Linn record­ing of Bach’s Matthew Pas­sion (re­viewed by Michael Tumelty on page six). Di­rec­tor John Butt takes a one-voice-per-part approach to the score and in this con­cert Ni­cholas Mul­roy will re­play his per­for­mance as the Evan­ge­list, while Rod­er­ick Bryce sings the words of Christ. Cho­ris­ters from St Mary’s Epis­co­pal Cathe­dral will pro­vide the bol­ster­ing choral forces here. The disc may be new but this is the ninth con­sec­u­tive year that the Dunedins have turned in an Easter Matthew Pas­sion for the home crowd. Other forces first per­formed it on Good Fri­day 1727 and it found a new cham­pion a cen­tury later in Felix Men­delssohn.

The Ed­in­burgh Royal Choral Union per­forms JSB’s St John Pas­sion, an ear­lier work, but in­tended for the same date in the cal­en­dar at Leipzig. This larger force, which also per­formed their New Year Mes­siah at St Cuth­bert’s – in the ab­sence of the Usher Hall – fea­tures tenor Si­mon Wall as the Evan­ge­list, and Epis­co­pal Bishop of Ar­gyll and the Isles Martin Shaw singing the words of Christ. As be­fits a piece de­rived from the slim­mer of the gospels, it is a briefer work and less in­ci­dent-packed. It is also, ar­guably, more med­i­ta­tive, if not down­right gloomy in places. The con­duc­tor is the man who has done so much to re­vi­talise the Choral, Michael Bawtree.

It is pos­si­ble to catch both choirs and both Pas­sions by go­ing to the per­for­mance in Dun­blane Cathe­dral to­mor­row at 6pm.

2 CARNEGIE HALL,DUN­FERMLINE, TONIGHT,7.30PM;MOTHER­WELL CIVIC THEATRE, MON­DAY, 7.30PM; RE­GAL COM­MU­NITY THEATRE, BATH­GATE, TUES­DAY, 7.30PM; RYAN CEN­TRE, STRAN­RAER, WED­NES­DAY, 7.30PM; MACROBERT, STIR­LING, THURS­DAY, 8PM

THE WALL A week from to­day, DC Jack­son’s de­but full-length play will have reached the Har­bour Arts Cen­tre in Irvine, but the cur­rent crop of gal­lus pupils at Ste­warton Academy weren’t pre­pared to wait that long to see what that au­gust in­sti­tu­tion’s old boy had made of his youth in their neck of the woods. So a large posse of them turned up at Glas­gow’s Tron in the show’s open­ing week to make like the liveli­est, most re­ac­tive au­di­ence any­one but the hardto-please au­thor would wish for. Such an evening makes clear that it is not true that young peo­ple have no in­ter­est in the theatre, they just need to see more in the theatre of the stuff that young peo­ple are in­ter­ested in.

Border­line’s pro­duc­tion is ex­actly what a tour­ing show should be, and Fife, La­nark­shire and West Loth­ian are likely to find that Jack­son’s Ayr­shire ex­pe­ri­ence is aw­fully like the lo­cal lives of teenagers most places. It’s a kind of ob­vi­ous com­par­i­son, but The Wall hits the same tar­gets as Bryan El­s­ley’s Skins on Chan­nel Four or the con­tro­ver­sial con­tem­po­rary books of Melvyn Burgess. The sex, drugs and swear­ing are all part of the mix, but there is a moral core that young­sters want and their guardians are glad for. Di­rected by the Tron’s most re­cent ex-di­rec­tor, Gre­gory Thompson, he and Jack­son are well-served by an ex­cel­lent quar­tet of per­form­ers: Scott Hoat­son as the con­fused Barry, RSAMD CPP-course grad­u­ate Kirstin McLean as his gothy love-in­ter­est Michelle, Finn den Her­tog as hi­lar­i­ous Ned philoso­pher Rab, and Sally Reid as Barry’s young sis­ter Norma, rev­el­ling in a role writ­ten spe­cially for her.

3 THE BLANK ALBUM ARCHES, GLAS­GOW, TUES­DAY TO THURS­DAY, 7.30PM

Chore­og­ra­pher Natasha Gil­more con­tin­ues on her mis­sion to make vivid, en­ter­tain­ing and hon­est dance theatre in The Blank Album. The things real peo­ple do and feel as they go about their ev­ery­day lives is her sub­ject and past projects seen in Glas­gow have in­volved the true sto­ries and ex­pe­ri­ences of refugees and asy­lum-seek­ers in Mother May I? as well as her own solo show Madam Bazie. This touch­ingly au­to­bi­o­graph­i­cal piece emerged from Gil­more’s own re­flec­tions on cul­tural her­itage, re­la­tion­ships and the on­go­ing ef­fect of mov­ing from her na­tive North Lon­don to Glas­gow. Asked at the time to sum up Madam Bazie in five words, Gil­more chose “comic, in­ti­mate, ridicu­lous, emo­tional, in­tri­cate”. This list could just as eas­ily ap­ply to the new com­pany work that’s now on tour, for along­side the high-en­ergy in­flu­ences of rock mu­sic and pop­u­lar cul­ture that have wide­spread pub­lic cur­rency, Gil­more in­tro­duces an emo­tion­ally charged

in­ti­macy that in­vites au­di­ences into the char­ac­ters’ in­ner worlds.

On-stage, the five per­form­ers cre­ate a live sound­score (com­posed by Quee MacArthur of Shooglenifty) – not just play­ing their in­stru­ments, but danc­ing with them in moves that ap­par­ently take the art of air gui­tar to the next level. And be­cause Gil­more, who has worked on sev­eral youth and com­mu­nity shows, is keen for younger au­di­ences to con­nect with con­tem­po­rary dance, The Blank Album is es­pe­cially suit­able for those who are 14+ (whether in real time or in their own air gui­tar-play­ing imag­i­na­tions).

4 SCOT­TISH DANCE THEATRE ED­IN­BURGH FES­TI­VAL THEATRE, WED­NES­DAY, 7.30PM

A week ago the dance critic of the Guardian, not a wo­man to lav­ish praise un­think­ingly, raved ful­somely about the ap­pear­ance in Lon­don of Janet Smith’s Dundee Rep­based ensem­ble af­ter it took its latest pro­gramme down to the Robin Howard Dance theatre at The Place. Here is some­thing we in Scot­land knew al­ready: it is not just the re­vival in for­tunes at Scot­tish Bal­let that make dance in this coun­try some­thing to be proud of. The ex­cel­lent com­pany at SDT have not only Smith’s witty chore­og­ra­phy to work with, but also her sharp taste in new dance­mak­ers – over the past 10 years, SDT has com­mis­sioned no fewer than 34 new works. At­ten­tion in this dou­ble-bill, en­ti­tled De­fined, has tended to fo­cus on Hofesh Shechter, whose hip­ness ex­tends to chore­ograph­ing the open­ing of the new se­ries of Skins on C4, but the other piece, Ten­ter­hook, is by Liv Lorent, whose won­der­fully sen­sual Lux­u­ria won a Bank of Scot­land Her­ald An­gel back in 2005.

The com­pany is on the road un­til May and comes back to Scot­land to do the S’s in April: Skye, Stron­tian, and Stir­ling.

5 MAKE MODEL LIQ­UID ROOMS, ED­IN­BURGH, THURS­DAY, 7PM

Back in De­cem­ber, Make Model ap­peared in Ed­in­burgh’s Out of Blue gallery un­der the I Fly Spit­fires club ban­ner along­side sound sculp­tors Found, who had remixed a thick slab of seven-inch vinyl by the band to give away on the night. Al­though the re­lease of Found’s This Mess We Keep Re­shap­ing album was at least 50% of the ex­cuse for the evening, the re­cent sign­ing of the Glas­gow-based band to EMI and the pres­ence of the record com­pany’s mo­bile record­ing van out­side pretty much made it Make Model’s night.

The six-piece choose who they play with and where they play with some care, as re­cent sup­ports to Bri­tish Sea Power, Blood Red Shoes, and The Twi­light Sad would sug­gest. Cur­rently they are off at SXSW in Austin, Texas where they will surely be mak­ing many more friends.

Song­writ­ers Lewis Gale and Gor­don Skene share front­line vo­cals with the ef­fer­ves­cent Aimi Gold, whose diminu­tive pres­ence re­calls Altered Images’ Clare Gro­gan at her young skip­pi­est. The band’s first in­de­pen­dent re­lease, The LSB (as in Less Said the Bet­ter), has now been re­worked by State­side pro­ducer Rich Costey for April re­lease on EMI. There is lit­tle typ­i­cally Glas­gow jan­gly and indie about ei­ther it or the band’s live show, and their mu­sic tends to look across the At­lantic to trendy mod­ern names like Flam­ing Lips and Ar­cade Fire. Lyri­cally, while their songs may be pro­saic in in­spi­ra­tion, they em­ploy a most dis­tinct and in­di­vid­ual approach to the English lan­guage. This is a post-US one-off in Scot­land be­fore the band head south, but there are gigs in Aberdeen, Dundee, Tuts in Glas­gow and Ed­in­burgh’s Cabaret Voltaire in the run up to the re­lease of the sin­gle on April 14.

PIC­TURE: GOR­DON TER­RIS

Clock­wise­from­main:Fin­nDen Her­tog and Sally Reid in The Wall; Philippa White in Scot­tish Dance Theatre’s Ten­ter­hook; Make Model;theDuned­inCon­sorts­ingBach;The BlankAl­bum

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.