JerusalemQuar­tetsparkles

Manch­ester hosted a thrilling con­cert by the young four, says An­drewMRose­ma­rine

The Jewish Chronicle - - Arts & Books -

A TASTE OF JERUSALEM The Jerusalem Quar­tet Manch­ester Cham­ber Con­certs So­ci­ety Manch­ester M13

WHAT AN evening! Such verve and drama!

To­gether since 1993, the Jerusalem Quar­tet is prob­a­bly the most tal­ented young quar­tet in the world. Jerusalem­born vi­o­list Amichai Grosz, and Min­skborn cel­list Kyril Zlot­nikov, lead their re­spec­tive sec­tions in Daniel Baren­boim’s Arab-Is­raeli West-East­ern Di­van Orches­tra. The two vi­o­lin­ists, Alexan­der Pavlovsky and Sergei Bresler, both Ukra­nian-born, stud­ied to­gether in Jerusalem.

From the stir­ring open­ing notes of Beethoven’s Quar­tet in F ma­jor op 18 no 1 at the be­gin­ning of this con­cert in Manch­ester, to its end with Brahms’ Quar­tet in A mi­nor op 51 no 2, they played pas­sion­ately and in strik­ing uni­son. If only all of Is­rael was as uni­fied. When their bows as­cended, all to­gether, high into the air at the end, they stayed there. The au­di­ence, cap­ti­vated by their in­tense mu­si­cal ex­pres­sion, was stunned by the the­atri­cal­ity.

The Beethoven sec­ond move­ment, in­spired by the tomb scene in Romeo and Juliet, was so sor­row­ful that even its pro­longed si­lences cried out with grief. The next move­ment meta­mor­phosed into a scherzo, which over­flowed with hap­pi­ness.

But an even greater trans­for­ma­tion came with Is­raeli Tzvi Avni’s 1962 work, mis­lead­ingly-named Sum­mer Strings. Its men­ac­ing dis­so­nances evoked a hor­ror-film’s lugubri­ous score. But it dis­played the Jerusalem Quar­tet’s ver­sa­til­ity, and en­ter­tained as a macabre night­mare.

Schu­bert’s Quar­tet Move­ment in C mi­nor D. 703 was so de­light­fully lyri­cal that one wanted to sing along. The Brahms was in­ten­sity it­self. Amichai Grosz got so trans­ported by it that his heels pounded the floor at one point. Kyril Zlot­nikov played with ex­u­ber­ance, of­ten smil­ing, some­times with fur­rowed brow, al­ways ab­sorbed and ex­pres­sive. Alexan­der Pavlovsky and Sergei Bresler charmed and sparkled.

Even those who had never heard cham­ber mu­sic were con­verted to its plea­sures.

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