Is­rael won on

ANAL­Y­SIS

The Jewish Chronicle - - NEWS - BY URI DROMI

THE CEL­E­BRA­TIONS in Gaza over the “vic­tory” of Ha­mas in the re­cent round of vi­o­lence pro­voke a strong sense of deja-vu.

Fol­low­ing Op­er­a­tion Cast Lead, Mousa Abu Mar­zook, deputy po­lit­i­cal bureau chief of Ha­mas, wrote in the Guardian that Is­rael had suf­fered “a de­ci­sive loss”. This prompted me to write a re­but­tal in the same pa­per. I said that for Mar­zook, “the de­struc­tion brought on the peo­ple of Gaza by the just, self-de­fen­sive ac­tions of Is­rael, is noth­ing but the spoils of vic­tory”.

It’s the same old story all over again. I guess that the only dif­fer­ence is that in 2009, some of the 490 com­ments I re­ceived in re­sponse to my col­umn were pos­i­tive, while I’m not sure that would hap­pen to­day. Un­less, of course, Guardian read­ers start re­al­is­ing that ex­e­cut­ing peo­ple with­out trial in the streets of Gaza is the same sort of sav­agery that has man­i­fested it­self in the be­head­ing of James Fo­ley.

Com­ing back to the ques­tion of who won and who lost, we are con­fronted again with the same para­dox: in re­cent armed col­li­sions, Arabs lose, but still claim “vic­tory”, while Is­raelis win, but still feel sour.

The Six-Day War was the last round in the his­tory of the Arab-Is­raeli con­flict that left the Is­raelis with a clear sense of vic­tory, and at the same time

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.