VIC­TIMS TRAPPED IN THEIR OWN HOMES

The Jewish Chronicle - - NEWS -

“STROKES make you a pris­oner in your own home.”

So says Ter­ence Cramer, an 88-year-old for­mer mu­si­cian from north Lon­don who suf­fered a stroke 16 years ago.

“It hap­pened while I was on hol­i­day in France with my late wife.

“I woke up and felt a bit funny. Next thing I knew I was in hos­pi­tal.”

Mr Cramer had suf­fered a se­vere stroke, which paral­ysed the left side of his body.

“Thank­fully my speech and sight were unim­paired,” he said.

Mr Cramer takes painkillers and does daily ex­er­cises to build up his strength.

He says the hard­est thing to cope with is not be­ing able to get around un­der his own steam.

“I can’t drive be­cause I can’t use my left hand. You feel very lonely — that’s the worst thing.

“I go out a cou­ple of times a week to the Jewish Care Stroke Club where I meet oth­ers in sim­i­lar cir­cum­stances, and to the So­bell Cen­tre where I do He­brew and mu­sic ap­pre­ci­a­tion classes.

“Get­ting out is mar­vel­lous. It is so im­por­tant, along with hav­ing peo­ple around you who care.” For de­tails of the Jewish Care Stroke Club, con­tact Jewish Care Di­rect on 0208 922 2000 or email helpline@jcare.org

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.