Martin Weil

The Jewish Chronicle - - LIFE -

BORN BER­LIN MARCH 24 1923. DIED BOW­DON, CHESHIRE, JAN­UARY 16 2016, AGED 92

THE SOLE sur­vivor of his fam­ily, who were all mur­dered in the Holo­caust, Martin Weil – (Meir ben Shmuel) – never for­got his par­ents, Sally and Har­riet Weil, his two older sis­ters Han­nah, and Felice, and a younger sis­ter and brother Net­tie and Sig­field. Hav­ing reached Bri­tain as a Kin­der­trans­port child, he con­stantly pined for them with a sense of guilt that he had man­aged to es­cape and they had not.

Weil ar­rived in Southamp­ton on April 23 1939, bear­ing his Kin­der­trans­port Child num­ber 4352, He was 16 years old, and left, as he al­ways main­tained, against the wishes of his father who won the Iron Cross dur­ing the First World War and wanted to keep the fam­ily to­gether.

Al­though un­der rad­i­cally dif­fer­ent cir­cum­stances, Weil was fol­low­ing in the foot­steps of an il­lus­tri­ous back­ground of rab­bis and com­mu­nity lead-

The Kin­der­trans­port doc­u­ment which brought 16 year old Weil to Bri­tain ers, one of whom was the first Chief Rabbi of Eng­land Rabbi Nathan Adler.

Hav­ing stud­ied en­gi­neeringat Ber­lin’s Ort school, he was ap­pren­ticed to Birm­ing­ham’s Jewish-owned mechan- ical en­gi­neer­ing firm Mid­land Gauge & Tool and quickly worked his way up to the top of his pro­fes­sion, work­ing

Martin Weil: good friend to many

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