Re­mem­brance at Cathe­dral of Trees

The Oban Times - - OUTDOORS -

Al­though the au­tumn gales have now taken away most of the leaves at the Cathe­dral of Trees, there was a mo­ment a week or so ago when it was full of spec­tac­u­lar colour.

The bright red leaves around the al­tar cross were a strong vis­ual echo of the blood spilled by those who gave their lives in the First World War and later con­flicts.

The loss through war was part of the in­spi­ra­tion for the cathe­dral’s cre­ation in 1921 but there is also a sense of hope and re­gen­er­a­tion.

To­day, with the felling of the conifers in the sur­round­ing woods, light is now flood­ing back into the cathe­dral af­ter many years of par­tial shade.

This is bring­ing a prom­ise of new growth af­ter years of stag­na­tion. Plans are now in hand to re­store the ar­chi­tec­tural fea­tures of the cathe­dral and to cre­ate an amenity wood­land of na­tive broadleaf trees around the site.

The core aim of the Glen­cruit­ten Cathe­dral of Trees (SCIO), which owns and runs the site, is to recre­ate and main­tain the area as a place of peace, rich in bio­di­ver­sity and of­fer­ing a wel­come to the com­mu­nity and to all vis­i­tors and pil­grims.

The bright red leaves around the al­tar cross were a strong vis­ual echo of the blood spilled in the First World War.

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