How Clau­dia put the su­per in su­per­mod­els

The Observer - - NEWS -

Clau­dia Schif­fer has said that she couldn’t stop laugh­ing when she first heard the term “su­per­model”. Then she thought it was quite ap­pro­pri­ate, as she was shy, and would trans­form into her model per­sona, a bit like Clark Kent in his phone booth.

Ob­vi­ously, there’s an­other rea­son for Schif­fer’s good hu­mour – the mil­lions that she and other su­per­mod­els have earned. Which isn’t the case for all mod­els (many of whom end up be­ing badly treated, fi­nan­cially, sex­u­ally, ev­ery which way). Then there are all the other is­sues (weight, air­brush­ing, the pres­sures of ide­al­i­sa­tion) that per­me­ate like poi­sonous gases through to or­di­nary wom­ankind.

How­ever, for all that, mod­el­ling re­mains one of the few in­dus­tries where the lead fe­male play­ers tend to out­rank and out-earn men – where the gen­der pay and power gaps are all but re­versed. And while this is yoked to the idea that women must, above all, be beau­ti­ful, it shouldn’t be dis­counted that many big mod­els have also ended up as cred­i­ble busi­ness women, dis­play­ing mar­ket­ing and brand­ing tal­ents far sur­pass­ing mere looks.

All in all, plenty for the likes of Ms Schif­fer to laugh about there.

Getty

One rea­son for Clau­dia Schif­fer’s good hu­mour is the mil­lions she’s earned.

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