TEENAGE WIN­NER TO SUE AS My life isn’t all cham­pagne and sparkles... Lotto win has made it ten times worse

The People - - NEWS FEATURES & - By Vikki White

BRI­TAIN’S youngest EuroMil­lions win­ner says her stu­pen­dous wind­fall has ru­ined her life.

And Jane Park, who was only 17 when she scooped £1mil­lion with her first-ever ticket, is con­sid­er­ing le­gal ac­tion against lottery bosses for neg­li­gence.

As­ton­ish­ingly, she claims some­one her age should not have been al­lowed to win.

In a breath-tak­ing whinge about her jack­pot, Jane, now 21, says the money has made her life ten times worse.

The at­trac­tive blonde told the Sun­day Peo­ple she is…

SICK of shop­ping for de­signer good­ies.

STRUG­GLING to find a gen­uine boyfriend who isn’t af­ter her money.

MISS­ING her Benidorm hol­i­days be­cause trips to up­mar­ket re­sorts are too snooty.

BUR­DENED with the “stress” of be­ing a mil­lion­airess.

Jane, speak­ing in the same week she pleaded not guilty in her home city of Ed­in­burgh to a charge of drink driv­ing at a McDon­ald’s, said: “At times it feels like win­ning the lottery has ru­ined my life.

“I thought it would make it ten times bet­ter but it’s made it ten times worse. I wish I had no money most days. I say to my­self, ‘My life would be so much eas­ier if I hadn’t won.’

“Peo­ple look at me and think, ‘I wish I had her life­style, I wish I had her money.’ But they don’t re­alise the ex­tent of my stress.

“I have ma­te­rial things but apart from that my life is empty. What is my pur­pose in life?”

Jane added: “I think 18 should be the min­i­mum age for win­ning the lottery, at the least. The cur­rent age of 16 is far too young.”

Fizzy

Back in 2013, Jane was a giddy 17- year- old toast­ing her win with Scot­tish fizzy pop Irn Bru be­cause she was too young for cham­pagne.

She was work­ing as an ad­min temp for £8 an hour and living with her mum Linda in a two-bed­room flat on an Ed­in­burgh coun­cil es­tate.

Four years on she feels she never re­ally un­der­stood what dif­fer­ence the money would make to her life.

Jane said: “My nana Anne told me, ‘You might as well have given me a gun.’ I was like, ‘Nana, what are you talk­ing about? This is the best thing ever?’ But now I to­tally agree.

“She was say­ing you can’t give a 17-year-old that amount of money.”

Camelot, who run EuroMil­lions in the UK, ap­pointed an ad­viser to help Jane man­age her new wealth.

But Jane, who now owns two prop­er­ties and calls her­self a de­vel­oper, in­sists it was only fam­ily ad­vice that stopped her blow­ing all the money.

She said: “I’ve read about other l ot­tery win­ners who’ve just blown it all and I can to­tally see how it can be done.

“I was stuck in front of a fi­nan­cial ad­viser who was us­ing words like in­vest­ment bonds. I had no clue what they meant.” Jane splashed out on treats such as the Louis Vuit­ton hand­bag she still car­ries.

She also bought a chi­huahua, Princess, who didn’t last quite so long.

Jane said: “My dog stays with my aun­tie but I still go and see her.

“At the time there was too much go­ing on. She didn’t like my car and I didn’t have time for her.”

That car, an £18,000 pur­ple Range Rover, also failed to bring hap­pi­ness. Jane sighed and said: “It was flashy and peo­ple were al­ways look­ing at me. But it was far too big.”

And while Jane trav­elled to the US and the Mal­dives, she prefers Benidorm and Magaluf.

“I don’t go on hol­i­day that much, about four times a year,” she said. “I wait un­til my friends can go.

“And although I’ve been to the Mal­dives I much pre­fer Benidorm be­cause no­body y is look­ingg down at

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