Knit­ting

SPEND A DAY LEARN­ING A NEW SKILL. MIND­FUL AND MIND FULL ( IN A GOOD WAY)

The Simple Things - - LIVING - By KATE PETTIFER Be­gin­ner Knit­ting at Tea & Craft­ing costs £40; teaand­craft­ing.co.uk.

‘CAKE OF YARN’, ‘PURL’, ‘garter stitch’ – there are phrases unique to knit­ting that are as sooth­ing as the pas­time it­self. What there isn’t, as our group of be­gin­ners dis­cusses on a Tues­day night at Tea & Craft­ing, is a knit­ting emoji. I can feel a pe­ti­tion com­ing on… but per­haps I should learn to knit first.

I have tried it be­fore as a child. My Aun­tie Ruby pa­tiently took me through the ba­sics, back when I was into Nik Kershaw and Clock­house at C&A. But it’s all a blur, as I pick up the nee­dles and wool pro­vided. There are six of us – all com­plete be­gin­ners – and our tu­tor Nessa be­gins by show­ing us how to cast on (cre­ate stitches). With a small group, we can learn at our own pace, and we’re given in­di­vid­ual point­ers where needed. The aim of the work­shop is to cre­ate a small patch of knit­ting – Nessa calls it a ‘Bar­bie dress’, but I think Bar­bie would find it want­ing (no sleeves, no back). I learn there are two stitches that are my bread and but­ter: learn to knit and to purl and you can do any­thing, says Nessa, chan­nelling Julie An­drews’ Do-Re-Mi. I feel em­pow­ered.

We man­age a few rows of garter stitch (wavy-look­ing, knit stitches), fol­lowed by stock­ing stitch (ar­row-like – knit, then purl), then thank­fully it’s time for tea and a chance for my tense fin­gers to un­furl. Part Two in­volves learn­ing rib (think cuffs) and moss stitch – both of which use var­ied com­bi­na­tions of knit­ting and purl­ing (Nessa was right). My fin­ished Bar­bie dress looks a lit­tle more cro­cheted than knit­ted, but I feel in­spired to prac­tise un­til my ten­sion and neat­ness is scarf-wor­thy. Even if it means wait­ing till Christ­mas 2019…

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.