Life-chang­ing travel ex­pe­ri­ences

25 must-try ad­ven­tures to make you see the world anew, from find­ing your feet on the dance­floors of BA to tak­ing on a pil­grim trail

Wanderlust Travel Magazine (UK) - - CONTENTS - WORDS SARAH BAX­TER

1TRAVEL ALONE SET OFF ON A SOLO AD­VEN­TURE

No com­pro­mises, no lim­i­ta­tions, no back-up. Trav­el­ling by your­self can be daunt­ing but em­pow­er­ing; there is no greater free­dom. You’ll have to rely on your own wits, but you can do what­ever you want – and you might dis­cover more about your­self along the way. Where? New­bie so­los can play it safe in re­gions well set up for trav­ellers: English­s­peak­ing Aus­tralia ( pic­tured) and New Zealand; laid-back South-east Asia; South Amer­ica’s ‘gringo trail’. Fre­netic In­dia or lesser-trod­den West Africa or Cen­tral Asia pro­vide big­ger chal­lenges. Take our ad­vice: Stay open to other peo­ple – put that book down, choose a seat at the bar, strike up con­ver­sa­tions. Who knows what might hap­pen? But re­mem­ber to have fun.

2 TRAVEL WITH STRANGERS TAKE A PUNT ON PEO­PLE YOU DON’T KNOW

Our best friends don’t nec­es­sar­ily make our best travel com­pan­ions – it can be more fun and less frac­tious to join like-minded strangers in­stead. So sign up for a small-group trip, es­pe­cially one with a clear fo­cus. Shar­ing a par­tic­u­lar in­ter­est or goal – whether that’s a phys­i­cal chal­lenge or a shared love of opera – will help you and your new travel-mates bond. You may even make new friends for life.

Where? Small-group trips probe all cor­ners of the globe; they’re es­pe­cially use­ful for tak­ing the has­sle out of travel to re­mote or bu­reau­cratic des­ti­na­tions. En­joy the team spirit of a Kil­i­man­jaro climb ( pic­tured), the cheer­ful ca­ma­raderie of a hands-on Out­back camp­ing trip (per­haps over­land­ing across the Kim­ber­ley in rugged Western Aus­tralia; see p126) or the mu­tual ap­pre­ci­a­tion of an ex­pert-led art tour in Italy.

Take our ad­vice: Be ready to compromise – if you ac­cept a group trip won’t be 100% per­fect, you’ll def­i­nitely en­joy it much more.

3 TAKE A SELF-PRO­PELLED JOUR­NEY FEEL THE FREE­DOM OF TRAV­EL­LING UN­DER YOUR OWN STEAM

You ex­pe­ri­ence a place dif­fer­ently when you travel more slowly. Trav­el­ling on foot, by bike or in a kayak, you see more, soak up more; you can ac­cess out-of-the-way places, meet more lo­cal peo­ple. There’s also a sense of free­dom in be­ing in charge of your pace, de­tours and des­ti­na­tion. It’s more the kind of travel as­so­ci­ated with early ex­plor­ers, with a sense of dis­cov­ery to match.

Where? A con­tin­u­ous long-dis­tance hike de­liv­ers a big buzz, so maybe try Eng­land’s spec­tac­u­larly un­du­lat­ing South West Coast Path or Patag­o­nia’s W Trek. Novice cy­clists should con­sider a flat, traf­fic-free ride such as France’s château-dot­ted River Loire or New Zealand’s Otago Cen­tral Rail Trail, or maybe chan­nel Canada’s early gold-rush prospec­tors by ca­noe­ing the Yukon River.

Take our ad­vice: Look into com­pa­nies that trans­port your lug­gage while you un­der­take your ad­ven­ture, so you can travel lighter.

4 GO EPIC ON YOUR DOORSTEP PLOT BIG AD­VEN­TURES CLOSE TO HOME

You can en­joy world-class ex­pe­ri­ences with­out even leav­ing the coun­try. Not only is there plenty of great stuff here, there are ways of mak­ing even the ev­ery­day seem like an ad­ven­ture. Add a twist or head a lit­tle out of your com­fort zone and even the streets you know best can blow your mind.

Where? Your doorstep. Wild camp atop the near­est hill ( pic­tured), take a hike af­ter dark, pad­dle your lo­cal river, cy­cle the edge of your county – mi­croad­ven­tures are ev­ery­where!

Take our ad­vice: Try some­thing you’ve never done be­fore – maybe your first wild swim, 50km hike or noc­tur­nal wildlife stake­out.

5 DO SOME­THING AF­TER DARK CHAL­LENGE YOUR SENSES BY EX­PLOR­ING AT NIGHT

Whether you’re on a walk, dive, drive or sa­fari, ev­ery­thing feels dif­fer­ent when the lights go out. Your senses be­come more alert, fa­mil­iar ob­jects feel alien, dif­fer­ent an­i­mals come out to play and you get a new per­spec­tive. It can also be a lit­tle bit scary – but it’s no bad thing to spook your­self.

Where? Night sa­faris in African game parks ( pic­tured) yield a dif­fer­ent crew of crea­tures. Good spots for night dives in­clude Hawaii’s Kona coast (for manta rays) and the Mal­dives.

Take our ad­vice: If you’re afraid, look for guided ac­tiv­i­ties – for ex­am­ple, the Sierra Club leads evening hikes in LA’S Grif­fith Park.

6 DON’T JUST VISIT, EN­GAGE BE­COME PART OF THE COM­MU­NITY

By get­ting in­volved with lo­cal life – whether that’s sign­ing up as a vol­un­teer or spend­ing time in a fam­ily home – you’ll be viewed less as a tourist, more as a fel­low hu­man be­ing. This means gain­ing a more au­then­tic cul­tural in­sight; you won’t learn only about a des­ti­na­tion’s land­scapes and ar­chi­tec­ture but also about the peo­ple who make it tick.

Where? Vol­un­teer­ing op­por­tu­ni­ties are world­wide, but it pays to seek a cause you’re pas­sion­ate about and a project where your pres­ence is help­ful. Al­ter­na­tively, trek with Ber­bers in Morocco, stay in a ger ( pic­tured) with Mon­go­lian no­mads or book into a casa par­tic­u­lar (homes­tay) in Cuba.

Take our ad­vice: If stay­ing with a fam­ily, know the lo­cal rules – what you should wear, how to eat. It’s re­spect­ful to know the so­cial norms, such as the lo­cal word for ‘thank you’.

7 GET JOIN CROWD CAUGHT THE UP IN FES­TI­VAL FEVER

While es­cap­ing from the masses is of­ten a good thing, some­times it’s bet­ter to join in. There’s noth­ing quite like be­ing swept up in a great gath­er­ing – you’ll see the lo­cal peo­ple let­ting their hair down, per­form­ing old rit­u­als, cooking up spe­cial­i­ties and honour­ing their saints, rel­a­tives, spir­its or samba bands. Noisy, hec­tic, messy may­hem? Quite pos­si­bly. In­for­ma­tive fun? Hell yeah!

Where? It’s best when you hap­pen upon a lo­cal knees-up, but you might want to plan ahead to make sure you’re in the right place at the right time to ‘play mas’ ( join­ing a mas­quer­ade band) at Trinidad Car­ni­val, get paint-splat­tered at Holi in In­dia ( pic­tured) or booze it up at Mu­nich’s Ok­to­ber­fest.

Take our ad­vice: Hook up with a lo­cal who can fill you in on the event dos and don’ts.

8 EYE­BALL AN AN­I­MAL GET UP CLOSE TO THE MOST IM­PRES­SIVE SPECIES

Com­ing face to face with a big, beau­ti­ful, pow­er­ful crea­ture will put you firmly in your place. Also, the best wildlife ex­pe­ri­ences of­ten hap­pen in the most beau­ti­ful spots. Pre­pare to feel awed, vul­ner­a­ble and hum­bled – and maybe even ques­tion your re­spon­si­bil­ity to the planet.

Where? Head to Rwanda or Uganda to track moun­tain go­ril­las, spot tigers in In­dia, look for jaguars in the Brazil­ian Pan­tanal, cruise Sval­bard for po­lar bears ( pic­tured) or snorkel with whale sharks in Western Aus­tralia.

Take our ad­vice: Ap­pre­ci­ate lit­tle crit­ters, too – a good guide will point out smaller, equally en­thralling wildlife won­ders.

9 MAKE A PER­SONAL PIL­GRIM­AGE FOL­LOW YOUR PAS­SION, WHAT­EVER IT MAY BE

For some, it’s say­ing a prayer in the Vat­i­can’s St Peter’s Basil­ica. For oth­ers, it’s eat­ing a peanut but­ter-and-ba­con sand­wich by Elvis’s Grace­land grave. We all have our pas­sions – fol­low yours.

Where? The Camino de San­ti­ago ( pic­tured) is the clas­sic pil­grim­age trail, but you might find more spir­i­tu­al­ity on the UK’S St Cuth­bert’s Way or the Via Fran­ci­gena to Rome. Mu­sic fans might like to hit the Blues High­way from Nashville to New Or­leans, while book­worms could fol­low in Phileas Fogg’s foot­steps.

Take our ad­vice: Don’t be dis­suaded. If you re­ally want to visit the child­hood home of ev­ery Bea­tle, just go ahead and do it.

10 LEARN SOME­THING NEW EX­PAND YOUR MIND WHILE YOU TRAVEL THE GLOBE

Study­ing while you’re over­seas could change your life – maybe you’ll en­joy your PADI course so much that you’ll ditch your day job to be­come a div­ing in­struc­tor. Even if it doesn’t, it will give you new, po­ten­tially use­ful skills, whether they be con­ver­sa­tional French, bread-mak­ing or salsa danc­ing. Chances are you’ll gain a deeper in­sight into ev­ery­day life, too.

Where? Learn­ing a lan­guage in a coun­try in which it’s spo­ken is more ben­e­fi­cial and fun – try Span­ish lessons in Gu­atemala or a com­bi­na­tion Por­tuguese-and-samba course in Brazil. Learn si­tar-play­ing in In­dia, cow­boy skills in Mon­tana or gelato-mak­ing in Italy.

Take our ad­vice: Stay with a lo­cal fam­ily dur­ing your learn­ing hol­i­day, so you’re fully im­mersed in the lan­guage and cul­ture.

11 TRAVEL SLOWLY REL­ISH RATHER THAN RUSH

Heed the words of Carl Honoré, au­thor of In Praise of Slow, who writes: “The Slow phi­los­o­phy is… about seek­ing to do ev­ery­thing at the right speed. Savour­ing the hours and min­utes rather than just count­ing them. Do­ing ev­ery­thing as well as pos­si­ble,

in­stead of as fast as pos­si­ble.” Ap­ply that to your trav­els: linger longer in one place rather than dash­ing from spot to spot; eat sus­tain­ably, re­gion­ally and sea­son­ally; take the time to chat, ab­sorb, walk and ex­plore. It can lead to ge­o­graph­i­cally lim­ited but ar­guably more en­light­en­ing ex­pe­ri­ences.

Where? Plan a glo­ri­ous culi­nary break in Italy’s Pied­mont re­gion ( pic­tured), HQ of the Slow Food move­ment. Al­ter­na­tively, cruise along Alaska’s In­side Pas­sage, walk be­tween vil­lages in the In­dian Hi­malaya or hire a city apart­ment for a fort­night to blend in lo­cally.

Take our ad­vice: Trust in serendip­ity – put the guide­book and smart­phone down for a while and just see where life takes you.

12 SEEK SPIR­I­TUAL OUT A PLACE VISIT A SITE THAT WILL SUC­COUR YOUR SOUL

‘Spir­i­tual’ means dif­fer­ent things to dif­fer­ent peo­ple. It might mean wor­ship­ping a de­ity at a tem­ple or even im­mers­ing your­self in the wilder­ness, so that you feel a con­nec­tion to na­ture. Some places just have a way of seep­ing into your be­ing; of mak­ing you ask new ques­tions about your­self, about oth­ers, maybe even hu­man ex­is­tence as a whole.

Where? Choose a site filled with devo­tees, such as the ghats (river­side steps) of In­dia’s holy city of Varanasi or the tem­ples of Ky­oto, Ja­pan ( pic­tured). Or seek the spir­i­tu­al­ity of na­ture on a stroll around Ti­bet’s Mount Kailash or a camp-out at Aus­tralia’s Uluru. Take our ad­vice: Re­main re­spect­ful. Don’t cross off-lim­its ar­eas and ask if there is a dress code or if an of­fer­ing is re­quired.

13 GO ON A MAS­SIVE JOUR­NEY DON’T JUST SET­TLE FOR A QUICK GET­AWAY – EX­TEND YOUR TRAV­ELS

A two-week trip pro­vides a fan­tas­tic dose of oth­er­ness. So just imag­ine how much bet­ter it might be to go for longer: a month, six months, six years! Ex­tended trav­el­ling doesn’t just mean cov­er­ing more ground, it pro­vokes an all-round at­ti­tude shift. You can ul­ti­mately move more slowly and take more de­tours; you’re also forced to cope with catas­tro­phes and, at times, even bore­dom. Even­tu­ally, though, you will start to for­get the stresses of home and sink into a dif­fer­ent mind­set. It’s the ul­ti­mate free­dom.

Where? Ev­ery­where! Maybe at­tempt a round-the-world trip, stop­ping off in Asia, Aus­tralia and the USA. Or per­haps fo­cus on one re­gion, such as In­dia by rail ( pic­tured), over­land­ing in South Amer­ica or walk­ing across the whole of Europe.

Take our ad­vice: Don’t over-plan – things will al­ways go awry in some way. Have a ba­sic itin­er­ary, but al­low wig­gle room for spon­tane­ity and cock-ups.

14 GO FAR FROM ANY­WHERE TRAVEL SOME­WHERE TRULY OFF THE GRID

Ac­cord­ing to a 2018 Of­com re­port, Brits spend an av­er­age of 24 hours a week on the in­ter­net. Just think how you

could be spend­ing that day. Take a dig­i­tal detox by go­ing com­pletely off-grid; travel some­where wild and re­mote to free your­self from the on­line world and en­joy en­gag­ing with the real world in­stead.

Where? Tourists aren’t al­lowed on­line in North Korea. Or feel your own in­signif­i­cance in an enor­mous wilder­ness such as the Cana­dian Yukon, the high Hi­malaya, the Namib Desert ( pic­tured) or the Ama­zon.

Take our ad­vice: You can find in­ter­net ac­cess in even the most un­likely places these days, so self-dis­ci­pline may be re­quired. At least dis­able so­cial me­dia and leave your phone for emer­gen­cies only.

15 TRAVEL CRE­ATIVELY TURN YOUR JOUR­NEY INTO A MEM­O­RABLE PIECE OF ART

We all like tak­ing hol­i­day snaps, but how about tak­ing your cre­ativ­ity a lit­tle fur­ther? Write a blog or trav­el­ogue, paint a pic­ture, pen a song or make a video about your trip and it will force you to look at ev­ery­thing dif­fer­ently; to con­sider other an­gles and per­spec­tives; to re­ally look. Plus, you’ll have a unique sou­venir at the end.

Where? Book a trip specif­i­cally fo­cused on a cre­ative pur­suit, such as an art sa­fari in Malawi or a travel-writ­ing re­treat in Spain. Or per­haps try mak­ing a short film of a long-dis­tance cy­cle trip across Asia.

Take our ad­vice: Don’t get hung up on qual­ity, just cre­ate. Write, sketch or com­pose what­ever comes into your head – you can edit it into per­fec­tion af­ter­wards.

16 BE WOWED BY NA­TURE DE­LIGHT IN THE PLANET’S MOST DAZ­ZLING SPEC­TA­CLES

For all hu­mankind’s in­cred­i­ble in­ven­tions, there are many nat­u­ral phe­nom­ena that knock them all for six. No movie spe­cial ef­fect can match see­ing first-hand the mag­i­cal sky-dance of the aurora bo­re­alis (or aurora aus­tralis – if you’re in the south­ern hemi­sphere), the ethe­real glow of bi­o­lu­mi­nes­cence, the flash and fury of a light­ning storm or the rage of a tor­nado. Wit­ness­ing any one of these will make you bow down to Mother Na­ture.

Where? For aurora thrills, head to the light-pol­lu­tion-free, less cloudy parts of the Arc­tic Cir­cle – Abisko in Swe­den, Fin­nish La­p­land ( pic­tured). For bi­o­lu­mi­nes­cence try vis­it­ing the la­goons in Puerto Rico and Tobago.

Take our ad­vice: In­crease your chances of sight­ings with plan­ning and re­search: bi­o­lu­mi­nes­cence is brighter around a new moon; aurora re­gions is­sue fore­casts pre­dict­ing the like­li­hood of dis­plays.

17 FOL­LOW AN AN­CIENT TRAIL FEEL THE FORCE OF OUR FORE­BEARS

Trac­ing the routes of erst­while ex­plor­ers, emi­grants, mer­chants, mon­archs, pioneers and pil­grims of­fers a con­nec­tion back to the past. Fol­low­ing their for­ma­tive foot­steps brings the his­tory of the world to life, and can im­bue your mod­ern-day trav­els with greater mean­ing.

Where? Hike Hadrian’s Wall ( pic­tured) or the 15th-cen­tury paving slabs of Peru’s Inca Trail, or even cy­cle graf­fi­tied con­crete re­mains along the Ber­lin Wall Trail. Plot an over­land ex­pe­di­tion along the Silk Road or from St Louis to the Pa­cific in the wake of Lewis and Clark, whose 1808 ex­pe­di­tion first opened up the western USA. Or just bag a flight to the ul­ti­mate ex­plorer homage: the South Pole.

Take our ad­vice: Read up be­fore you go, and know how to recog­nise a strip lynchet (earth ter­race), Ro­man road, Ne­olithic tomb or a car­a­vanserai (old inn).

18 DO SOME­THING FOR THE FIRST TIME IN­VIG­O­RATE YOUR TRAV­ELS BY DO­ING SOME­THING NEW

Don’t go back to the same old places in the same old ways. Head to a coun­try you’ve never vis­ited, use a mode of trans­port you’ve never tried, eat a dish you can’t pro­nounce – and have the time of your life.

Where? The trav­el­sphere is al­ways dream­ing up ad­ven­tures. Try stand-up pad­dle­board­ing in the Greek Is­lands ( pic­tured), fat­bik­ing over the UAE’S dunes or us­ing an app such as Eatwith to join a din­ner party in Paris.

Take our ad­vice: These days it’s easy to find unique ex­pe­ri­ences. Fol­low lo­cal blog­gers/ papers on so­cial me­dia to see what’s new.

19 SCARE YOUR­SELF PUSH YOUR LIM­ITS FOR THE MOST MEM­O­RABLE EX­PE­RI­ENCES

Leav­ing your com­fort zone is how you learn and grow – you’ll be sur­prised what you’re ca­pa­ble of. Travel en­cour­ages such bound­ary push­ing, and can build con­fi­dence. Em­brace it!

Where? Arachno­phobes could sleep in a ham­mock in the Ama­zon. Heights-haters could walk across a glass sus­pen­sion bridges in China ( pic­tured). You could even cage dive with great whites off South Africa.

Take our ad­vice: There’s no need to ut­terly ter­rify your­self – pick a chal­lenge that will ul­ti­mately give you a buzz, not a coro­nary.

20 SLEEP UN­DER THE STARS STARE UP AT THE HEAV­ENS TO RE­SET YOUR WORLD VIEW

There’s noth­ing like con­tem­plat­ing the huge, dark un­know­able­ness of the uni­verse for putting us in our place. It’s a re­minder of how teeny-tiny we are. It’s also healthy to get away from light-pol­luted civil­i­sa­tion, not to men­tion how mag­i­cal it is to lie back and be daz­zled by a bil­lion stars.

Where? Of­fi­cial In­ter­na­tional Dark Sky Re­serves – such as Jasper in Canada or Namibia’s Nami­brand – are a good start. Wild camp on Ex­moor, spend a night with Be­douin in Jor­dan’s Wadi Rum ( pic­tured) or splash out on a five-star sa­fari lodge that has four-poster beds you can wheel out­side.

Take our ad­vice: Down­load an astron­omy app such as Night Sky to help you iden­tify the stars. Con­sider co­or­di­nat­ing your sleep-out with the next me­teor shower.

21 ABAN­DON YOUR IN­HI­BI­TIONS GO ON – THROW CAU­TION TO THE WIND!

Us Brits can be a re­served bunch. But away from the so­cial con­ven­tions and judg­ing eyes of our brethren, why not loosen up a lit­tle? No one knows you, af­ter all. So go for that skinny dip, shake your stuff at the lo­cal fes­ti­val, sing like no one’s lis­ten­ing in that packed karaoke bar. Set your­self free!

Where? Swim naked on the azure-lapped beaches of the Greek isles. Steam in a Ja­panese on­sen (cloth­ing not al­lowed). Dance out­ra­geously at a Rio Car­ni­val bloco (street party), learn how to haka (war dance) in New Zealand or hit Ha­vana’s salsa clubs.

Take our ad­vice: While it’s good to let go, be sure not to break any laws at the same time. Not all beaches wel­come birth­day suits...

22 SAVE A SPECIES HELP CON­SERVE WILDLIFE (AND CHANGE MINDS LO­CALLY) BY PAY­ING THEM A VISIT

The ral­ly­ing cry of many con­ser­va­tion or­gan­i­sa­tions is that an­i­mals are ‘worth more alive’. Prove that’s true by go­ing to see the species that need help. Your pres­ence – and pounds ster­ling – can help con­vince lo­cal com­mu­ni­ties and gov­ern­ments that there is value in pro­tect­ing habi­tats. Tourism can be a pow­er­ful force in pro­vid­ing the kind of in­cen­tives that may turn hardened poach­ers into po­ten­tial tour guides and threat­ened land­scapes into na­tional parks.

Where? Spot­ting tur­tles in Tor­tuguero, on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica, can have huge lo­cal ben­e­fits. One year of tur­tle-based tourism here can gen­er­ate around US$6.5 mil­lion (£5m), says the World Wildlife Fund. Al­ter­na­tively, spend your days look­ing for ele­phants ( pic­tured) in Africa. Ac­cord­ing to the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a live ele­phant is worth US$22,966 (£17,750) a year to the lo­cal econ­omy through eco-tourism.

Take our ad­vice: Do your re­search and use guides and com­pa­nies that of­fer sus­tain­able and re­spon­si­ble an­i­mal in­ter­ac­tions.

23 TRAVEL FOR THE GREATER GOOD PUT YOUR MONEY WHERE IT’S NEEDED, WHEN IT’S NEEDED

Af­ter a nat­u­ral dis­as­ter or ter­ror­ist at­tack, an en­tire coun­try is of­ten struck off the travel map. Some­times the For­eign Of­fice (FCO) warns against re­turn­ing – and these warn­ings should be heeded when in ef­fect. But some­times it’s only me­dia hype that keeps trav­ellers away, which can leave lo­cal peo­ple deal­ing not only with the ini­tial dis­as­ter but loss of liveli­hood, too. By vis­it­ing such places, you might have to cope with a less-than-per­fect in­fra­struc­ture but you’re also as­sured the warm­est of wel­comes.

Where? Dominica, Puerto Rico and other Caribbean is­lands hit by 2017’s dev­as­tat­ing hur­ri­canes; earth­quake-re­cov­er­ing Nepal ( pic­tured); re­bound­ing Egypt and Tu­nisia, most of which is now off the FCO no-go list.

Take our ad­vice: Don’t go back too soon – in the im­me­di­ate af­ter­math of a dis­as­ter, your pres­ence may be more of a hin­drance.

24 AC­CEPT THE KIND­NESS OF STRANGERS TRAVEL WITH AN OPEN MIND AND AN OPEN HEART

Lis­ten to news re­ports and it’s all doom and gloom, but head there your­self and you dis­cover over­whelm­ing hos­pi­tal­ity, with peo­ple who have lit­tle giv­ing so much. Learn to ac­cept it gra­ciously, and pay it back in turn.

Where? Iran ( pic­tured) and Su­dan, both renowned for be­ing ‘dan­ger­ous’, are also well known for their amaz­ing hos­pi­tal­ity.

Take our ad­vice: Learn a lit­tle lo­cal lingo, so you can con­verse with your hosts – even if it’s only ‘thank you for my eighth cup of tea’.

25 AND FI­NALLY, TRAVEL MORE! GET AWAY AS OF­TEN AS YOU CAN

Noth­ing opens your mind, broad­ens your hori­zons and re­vives your body and soul quite like travel. Ex­po­sure to new sites, so­ci­eties and ex­pe­ri­ences is for­ma­tive in the best of ways, we be­lieve, so do it as of­ten as you can. Forgo buy­ing de­signer shoes and fancy meals and save for trips in­stead – when you look back years later, you’ll surely have far fonder mem­o­ries of your time spent abroad than of a half-for­got­ten pair of Gucci brogues. Find cre­ative ways to carve out more time or money for travel, or sim­ply squeeze in lit­tle mi­croad­ven­tures where you can. Ne­go­ti­ate a four-day week, so you can set off on mini-breaks; stock­pile hol­i­day for a big trip; work out of a camper­van while you’re on the road; or maybe hous­esit for lo­cals when they go abroad. There’s al­ways a way! Where? Ev­ery­where!

Take our ad­vice: In be­tween trips, be sure to travel vi­car­i­ously – look out for news of var­i­ous travel talks and events (see p17), watch the many TV trav­el­ogues that ar­rive on our screens ev­ery sea­son and, of course, read Wan­der­lust!

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