KEY SOURCES

Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine - - MY EUREKA MOMENT -

DI­VORCE RECORDS

Many cou­ples didn’t seek an of­fi­cial sep­a­ra­tion when they split up as it was a costly af­fair. If you do find di­vorce records for your an­ces­tors, though, they can give you a de­tailed in­sight into their lives in­clud­ing why the re­la­tion­ship broke down. Search the Eng­land and Wales dataset on An­ces­try, Scot­tish records at nrscot­land.gov.uk/re­search/fam­ily- his­tory, while for Ir­ish records www.court­sni.gov.uk/en- GB/pages/de­fault.aspx is a good start­ing point.

ELEC­TORAL REG­IS­TERS

AND POLL BOOKS

Th­ese are a great way of track­ing down where your an­ces­tor was living be­tween cen­suses – or even be­fore th­ese were kept. An­ces­try has a large UK-wide col­lec­tion dat­ing from 1538 to 1965 ( es­pe­cially good for Lon­don records). Find­my­past holds more re­cent records of vot­ers and is cur­rently digi­tis­ing the Bri­tish Li­brary’s hold­ings.

FO­RUMS

If you hit a brick wall, try post­ing your query on a spe­cial­ist fo­rum – you never know who might see it. Try our fo­rum at www.whodoy­ou­thinky­ouaremagazine.com/fo­rum. Linda ex­plains: “There are some very help­ful peo­ple out there who are will­ing to give their time to help oth­ers.”

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