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Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine - - MY EUREKA MOMENT -

A huge range of maps and plans can be found in lo­cal ar­chives – from tithe maps to plans of col­liery work­ings, as in Richard’s case. Where writ­ten doc­u­ments fail to help solve a puz­zle, you may be able to un­ravel it by in­ter­pret­ing the re­main­ing vis­ual records. Ord­nance Sur­vey maps of­fer scale draw­ings of all el­e­ments of the land­scape and so are par­tic­u­larly use­ful. The coro­ner was re­spon­si­ble for in­quiries into sus­pi­cious or sud­den deaths and in­quests them­selves were of­ten held in the lo­cal pub­lic house. Held in lo­cal ar­chives if they sur­vive, in­quest re­ports can pro­vide an amaz­ing in­sight into the events sur­round­ing an an­ces­tor’s death. It’s worth check­ing news­pa­pers if you think that an in­quest may have been held, but you can’t find the re­port. Try british­news pa­per­sarchive.co.uk. As Richard says, it’s worth pay­ing a visit to the trea­sure trove that is your lo­cal li­brary and ar­chives. There are still a lot of doc­u­ments that haven’t yet found their way onto the in­ter­net and you never know what you might un­cover! Track down lo­cal ar­chives at The Na­tional Ar­chives’ new ‘Find an ar­chive’ ser­vice at dis­cov­ery. na­tion­alarchives.gov.uk/ find-an-ar­chive.

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